dhutch54

Slow speeds

3 posts in this topic

I have hughesnet and I was wondering if there was a way to run fiber optics from the dish to the modem ,then to my router ,and then out to the rest of my equipment ,I have checked and the Internet in my town has hardline DSL but there speeds are up to 4 Mbps on download and up to 5 Mbps on upload .and they have intentions of eventually running fiber optics but it could be 5 years ,at those speeds ,I don,t see me being able to use my internet as my main means of watching movies and videos .hughesnet speeds are ( they promise 15 Mbps on download & 2 Mbps on upload ,the best I have ever gotten is 9 Mbps on download ,and I have gotten 2 Mbps on 1 or 2 occasions it's usually under 1 Mbps .i,m just trying to get my speeds up .in your opinion will the hardline in my town hold up better than hughesnet ,it's totah and they do have unlimited data ,were hughesnet does not .any info would be appreciated 

sincerely dhutch54.    PS they even tried to tell me bandwidth and data are the same bandwidth is like a 1 lane highway changing it to a 4 lane highway that's increasing bandwidth ,data is what you use to watch videos, movies ,etc.

Edited by dhutch54
Just wanted to add a little info so that you know I,m pretty good with computers ,I just don,t know how to speed up my internet or if fiber optics would even help

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I believe in order to resource the proper hardware, let alone the fiber itself, would fiscally far outweigh just having a T1 (or a dedicated line from the ISP to your home) line pulled to your door for nearly the same end result. Your cap still lies within the bottleneck of satellite resources available through the ISP. You could achieve the same result by insuring quality lines from dish to modem => workstation.

 

It's all 'data'

What they are referring to with the four lane highway is a decent analogy. Traffic might not move any faster, but more 'data' will be available at the endpoint. Throughput still has constraints of the hardware / software at the modem:

Just as;

A four lane highway can hold four times as many cars, but there are still traffic jams, since the entrances and exits are not four lane, and have traffic signals.

 

 

 

 

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On 12/14/2016 at 6:50 AM, dhutch54 said:

I have hughesnet and I was wondering if there was a way to run fiber optics from the dish to the modem ,then to my router ,and then out to the rest of my equipment ,I have checked and the Internet in my town has hardline DSL but there speeds are up to 4 Mbps on download and up to 5 Mbps on upload .and they have intentions of eventually running fiber optics but it could be 5 years ,at those speeds ,I don,t see me being able to use my internet as my main means of watching movies and videos .hughesnet speeds are ( they promise 15 Mbps on download & 2 Mbps on upload ,the best I have ever gotten is 9 Mbps on download ,and I have gotten 2 Mbps on 1 or 2 occasions it's usually under 1 Mbps .i,m just trying to get my speeds up .in your opinion will the hardline in my town hold up better than hughesnet ,it's totah and they do have unlimited data ,were hughesnet does not .any info would be appreciated 

sincerely dhutch54.    PS they even tried to tell me bandwidth and data are the same bandwidth is like a 1 lane highway changing it to a 4 lane highway that's increasing bandwidth ,data is what you use to watch videos, movies ,etc.

To the first question, no.  You can't replace the coax with fiber optic cabling with Hughesnet.  It won't work.  

 

As for Hughesnet vs hardwired service from your town, it depends on whether the internet available from town is any good.  Normally Hughesnet is purchased by people that have no alternative, but sometimes even the available hardwired service is sub par, like with older DSL systems.  I'd ask around.  If it's deemed to be better, I'd go with the hard wired simply due to it not having data caps.    

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