mudmanc4

Testmy.net member EBrown is interviewed by the BBC

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Our very own @nanobot or EBrown has been interviewed by the BBC on Net Neutrality, here is what he had to say.

 

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Programmers such as Elliott Brown from Ohio have been participating in the debate on Stack Overflow.

"I'm not a political activist, I don't want to sway a person's vote one way or the other but I feel they need to have the right information at their fingertips," he told BBC Trending.

 

"I've been writing concrete and simple examples which frame this debate in laymen's terms and sending them to friends. No one except us has made the effort to read all the literature, we have a responsibility to explain it."

Brown is firmly in favour of net neutrality.

 

"It has huge implications for the whole internet. In the US there are only four or five major carriers. If they were to collaborate they could strangle data access to parts of the internet, it's not an understatement to say they could influence history," he said.

 

Very nicely worded Elliot :icon_thumright:

 

The full story can be found here

 

To get more information as to the issues regarding net neutrality, visit or even join the EFF (Electronic Frontier Foundation)

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Hah, forgot to post this here. Yeah, they asked me about it on Twitter a week or so ago.

 

It's an interesting topic, we're discussing things that should never have to be worried about, no one should fear that their ISP can censor what they can see based on the ISP's own political motives. (Hell, just look at the Comcast v. Netflix issue from a couple years ago: Netflix traffic was throttled to unbelievable slow speeds as a result of Comcast wanting to extort them for money.)

 

Personally, I am anti-government regulation, but in this case it's a necessity.

 

One of the arguments I have recently heard in favor of revocation of the net–neutrality law was:

 

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If an ISP is receiving an obscene amount of traffic from one source, they should be allowed to prioritize it in either direction.

 

This is a false premise, if the ISP's customers want traffic from that source, the ISP should not be throttling it in either direction. If your customers want to watch Netflix all day, you don't get to make additional profit off of that. The customer already pays for a broadband connection, it is the ISP's job to deliver that broadband service in an unbiased manner.

 

Thanks,

EBrown

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