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CA3LE6UY

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Everything posted by CA3LE6UY

  1. It's on an N Router. It's a Netgear WNDR3400 -- I'm pretty sure that those only connect using G though. Whoops.. I'm on the wrong account.. this is my test account, lol.
  2. Try as manufacturers might, attempts at autostereoscopic (glasses-free) TV have been subpar; existing tech typically makes for messy images due to ghosting, only provides a 3D effect if you're standing in one of a very few predetermined spots (usually 8-10 viewing angles, though we've heard of 64), and reduces display resolution -- all because only some pixels can be seen from each spot. With the occasional exception, it's not terribly impressive. Scientists at the National Chiao Tung University in Taiwan are looking to change that. Rather than block light with a parallax barrier, their screen uses a matrix of specially cut prisms to reflect it, reducing ghosting to nil and maintaining display resolution by sending the same image to each viewer. Though there are still a fixed number of viewing zones, the prisms are so tiny that manufacturers can simply add more prisms to each pixel to increase that number -- with 11 prisms per pixel, researchers say such a system could support 100 simultaneous 3D moviegoers. We've no word on whether the tech is affordable or when we'll see it, but we expect it to handily beat cyborg eyeballs to market.New glasses-free 3D tech uses per pixel prisms for zero crosstalk, audience flexibility originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 25 Mar 2010 22:04:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds. <h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6>Permalink | PhysOrg | Email this | Comments
  3. Thinking of picking up a VAIO CW over the weekend? You might want to hold those horses just a bit, at least until Sony (or someone) figures out what exactly is causing the batteries on these to zap themselves while asleep. Based on a raft of complaints -- nine pages strong and growing -- over at Notebook Review, it sounds as if the batteries within the outfit's new CW series (at least those with Core i3 CPUs and the 330M GPU) are fading inexplicably quick while resting, leaving many with next to no juice once they crack open the lid the next morning. All sorts of theories are flying, but one in particular seems to note that a bundled Sony battery management application could be causing cells to only charge to a certain percent even when the machine is "off." For now, some folks are actually flipping the battery out for a fraction of a second and popping it back in after putting it to sleep for the night in order to prevent the drain, but we get the feeling that a less janky fix should be in order. Right, Sony?Sony's VAIO CW draining the battery while asleep? originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 25 Mar 2010 21:33:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds. <h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6>Permalink | Notebook Review | Email this | Comments
  4. The secret behind MSG's surprise 3D broadcast of last night's Rangers/Islanders hockey game? It came together in a two week turnaround which repurposed equipment laying around between stops at a recent Black Eyed Peas concert and next month's NAB show in Las Vegas. Judging by the reviews it was worth the effort with more than a few indicating an interest in buying 3DTVs to check things out at home next time -- while it aired on Cablevision, all the reports we found were based on the screens located at the arena itself. Not everyone agreed on the best aspects of the new production: Christopher Botta of Fanhouse preferred a lack of "reaching through the screen" gimmicks while the New York Times report asked for more opportunities to feel like the players are popping out at the viewer, even though they found the standard HDTV feed "flat, underlit and distant" in comparison. We couldn't find any complaints regarding those ever-present 3D glasses, though issues like someone walking in front of the camera or on screen graphics appearing to leap off the screen revealed there's still a few kinks to work out (camera placement may be further adjusted during an upcoming renovation.) The appeal of 3D sports for fans has already been established, we're wondering if playing in a more 3D-ready arena might be used to convince Lebron or other stars to play home games at MSG, in the meantime, check out all the reviews and a few behind the scenes videos embedded after the break.Continue reading 3D hockey nets positive reviews, biggest surprise of the night was a Rangers win 3D hockey nets positive reviews, biggest surprise of the night was a Rangers win originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 25 Mar 2010 21:02:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds. <h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6>Permalink | Broadcasting and Cable, NHL Fanhouse, New York Times | Email this | Comments
  5. Fox Mobile unveiled its Bitbop venture this week that promises to provide a wealth of TV and movie entertainment from a variety of top-tier studios, and if you can get past the fact that you're actually going to have to pay for this content, it's shaping up to be a pretty promising system when it launches later this year. There's no live programming -- just a database of show episodes and movies that you have your choice of either streaming or downloading for later consumption over 3G or WiFi -- which makes it a little bit like using an on-demand service from your cable company. Bitbop was only demoing the BlackBerry version of its app at CTIA this week, but it looks like there'll be iPhone and Android versions on the way; at any rate, video quality looked plenty good on the Bold's 480 x 320 display. Initially, there'll be just one plan -- $9.99 a month for access to shows, while movies will be pay-per-view exclusively -- but we got the impression that the company is leaving the door open for other payment models down the road. Great, just what we needed: another really cool way to kill productivity. At least we'll be able to catch up on Gossip Girl in the process, we suppose! Follow the break for video.Gallery: Bitbop hands-on: is this the Hulu of mobile? Continue reading Bitbop hands-on: is this the Hulu of mobile? Bitbop hands-on: is this the Hulu of mobile? originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 25 Mar 2010 20:24:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds. <h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6>Permalink | Bitbop | Email this | Comments
  6. We got a peek today at the new "3-way" synchronization service from LG that the company is calling Air Sync; it's only available on the GD880 Mini right now in the UK, but they're looking to expand it across Europe and Asia before too long and -- if we're lucky -- North America eventually. So what is it, exactly? Basically, it's a synchronization service for text clipping, photos, videos, contacts, and the like that integrates with your PC using a downloadable client. After it's installed, you get a few new context menu items that let you fast-track content to your phone via the cloud, and we were pretty amazed at just how quickly the transfers consistently happened -- within a few seconds, a dialog pops up on LG's demo Mini notifying you that the goods have been received. It sounds like LG will be looking at deploying this with a subscription model in most markets, so don't expect gratis awesomeness -- but if you transfer tons of pictures from your desktop to your mobile, this might be the way to go. Follow the break for video. Gallery: LG Air Sync hands-on Continue reading LG Air Sync hands-on LG Air Sync hands-on originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 25 Mar 2010 19:50:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds. <h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6>Permalink | | Email this | Comments
  7. Lawmakers Debate the FCC's Broadband Plan yahoo.com Is public investment in broadband premature? thinkbroadband.com Cisco: 1 Trillion Connected Devices by 2013 wirelessweek.com Genachowski Vague On How FCC Would Get Spectrum If Broadcast Incentive Plan Fails multichannel.com American Cable Association Says Funds Going To Areas 'Already Sufficiently Served' By MSOs multichannel.com Internet caf owners asked to spy on customers theregister.co.uk Clearwire Readying Reseller Channels For 4G Expansion? crn.com The U.S. WiMAX Smart Grid: Cisco Backs Grid Net, Michigan Pilot earth2tech.com read comment(s) <br clear=all>
  8. OK, dudes -- we don't want to freak you out or anything, but the Wireless Litetouch Keyboard has cleared the FCC. Brought to you by Mad Catz, this bad boy (and its wired companion) was first unveiled at CES this year. Featuring an programmable LCD touchscreen with three different sets of "buttons" (number pad, media mode, and the user configurable MyEclipse mode) the latest entry to the Eclipse line has is sure to get admiring looks from the drone in the cubicle across the aisle. Compatible with Mac OS X as well as your many flavors of Windows, this bad boy will be out soon -- wireless for $129, or wired for $99. Jaw-dropping video after the break.Continue reading Eclipse Litetouch wireless touchscreen keyboard clears the FCC, on its way to retail (video) Eclipse Litetouch wireless touchscreen keyboard clears the FCC, on its way to retail (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 25 Mar 2010 18:59:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds. <h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6>Permalink | FCC, Mad Catz | Email this | Comments
  9. Free, ad-supported phones have long been a rumored endgame for Android, but the way that model ends up playing out may not happen the way everyone thought. mocoNews is citing "multiple sources who are familiar with the deals" in saying that Google has been sweetening the pot for both manufacturers and carriers of Android devices by tossing in a cut of the ad revenue generated from their services -- search, Maps, and the like. This would certainly explain Android's stratospheric rise through the ranks in carriers' lineups around the globe, and -- more importantly for consumers -- gives them more wiggle room to slap huge subsidies on handsets (assuming the trickle-down economic effect kicks in at all). For competitors, Google offers a unique value proposition here that can't really be met by anyone except perhaps Microsoft -- and with Redmond looking to reestablish its relevance in the mobile space this year more than any other in recent memory, we could definitely see the two sparring to line Verizon's and AT&T's pockets with the most green. Naturally, all the parties involved have clammed up -- no one's saying a peep about whether this is true, or to what extent -- but we certainly wouldn't be surprised.Google cutting in Android carriers, manufacturers on ad revenue? originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 25 Mar 2010 18:32:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds. <h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6>Permalink Phone Scoop | mocoNews | Email this | Comments
  10. The whole point of Gobi is that you can buy one device and use it with multiple network technologies or carriers, but apparently Qualcomm isn't kidding around about the idea. It just announced a slew of data chipsets (voice still isn't part of the picture) with all sorts of new goodies. New technologies supported include EV-DO Rev. A and Rev. B (the five people on earth using Rev. B will be thrilled), HSPA+, dual-carrier HSPA+ (which looks to be the evolutionary end of HSPA), and LTE. The mother of all these chipsets is the MDM9600, which can do LTE up to 100 Mbps, dual-carrier HSPA+ up to 42Mbps, HSPA+ up to 28Mbps, and EV-DO Rev. A / Rev. B. Qualcomm also says it's moving Gobi beyond just laptops, with USB modems, e-readers, and "gaming devices" now in the cards. No word on when they'll start showing up, but much of it will have to do with carrier rollout as much as Qualcomm's ability to ship these out the door.Qualcomm adding the kitchen sink to Gobi, including EV-DO Rev. A, dual-carrier HSPA+, and LTE originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 25 Mar 2010 18:04:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds. <h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6>Permalink | Qualcomm | Email this | Comments
  11. The last time we laid eyes on Synology's DiskStation line it was in the form of the DS409Slim -- a diminutive NAS without the 'zazz of lots of your flashier network storage solutions. The newly announced DS410 also keeps it pretty simple: features include four bays of RAID-5 storage, 256-bit encryption, Amazon S3 cloud backup, Apple Time Machine integration, media streaming, print server, and web hosting with PHP/MySQL. Don't worry, you Big Brother-types don't get left out either: the included Surveillance Station 4 software allows the deployment of multiple IP cameras and support for H.264 video. Available now for $500.Synology DS410 NAS will back up your files, won't incite a passionate response originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 25 Mar 2010 17:42:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds. <h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6>Permalink Engadget Spanish | Synology | Email this | Comments
  12. Like Boost Mobile and Cricket, Prepaid cell phone carrier MetroPCS has seen some early success in the mobile market by offering discount unlimited prepaid wireless plans with no contracts (almost) and by, refreshingly, making the . The company enjoys injecting disruptive pricing and no contract service into the wireless voice market, and has stated they hope to do the same thing for LTE service sometime this year. They're still not announcing pricing details, but MetroPCS this week did announce an LTE-partnership with Samsung for core network gear and the first MetroPCS LTE phone -- the SCH-r900. Like pricing, there's still no definitive data on their first LTE market launch, the company simply saying LTE arrives sometime "later this year." read comment(s) <br clear=all>
  13. Why carry around a netbook and a smartphone when you can have a netbook / smartphone? Why indeed. Especially when you can have something as sensible as the BPhone, which is now finally available for the completely reasonable price of $569.99 (unlocked, of course). That will get you a not-quite-pocketable convertible device with a 5-inch touchscreen, along with a 624MHz Marvell CPU, ARM Linux 2.6 for an OS, 256GB of flash storage, built-in Bluetooth, WiFi and GPS, and quad-band GSM connectivity on the "phone" side of the equation. Sound like just the thing you've been looking for? Hit up the link below to get your order in. [Thanks, BrianB]BPhone netbook / smartphone hyrbid now available to order originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 25 Mar 2010 17:21:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds. <h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6>Permalink PMP Today | China Grabber | Email this | Comments
  14. If you were getting bored with carrier fights over HD channel counts, it looks like TV providers will soon have something new to bicker about in television ads. Verizon this week announced via their At Home Blog that the company is planning to offer a 3DTV option later this year. Verizon was actually responding to Cablevision's decision to air a hockey game in 3D for the first time this week on their MSG Channel (see Cablevision discuss the offering here). Verizon of course took the opportunity to complain that Cablevision doesn't share the MSG channel with competitors:Until (our launch), you ll see various grandstanding plays by cable companies who also produce content and can play it on their networks in 3D, hoping to make headlines with their "firsts" while excluding Verizon and other competitors from carrying this material. Is it unrealistic to think integrated operators should share their 3D content with all their viewers, even those served by others?The FCC doesn't think so, recently taking steps that should eventually lead to companies like Cablevision being forced to share their own sports channels with competitors. As for 3DTV, Sony and Imax recently stated that carriers will need to dedicate 6MHz of bandwidth to offer the service. It's very possible that consumers (many of whom just bought a new HD set when prices fell) will see 3DTV as little more than a pricey gimmick, though the technology might see early traction among console gamers. read comment(s) <br clear=all>
  15. Not everything can be an Android smartphone, fellas... sometimes you just need an unobtrusive design, maybe some social networking connectivity, and a modest price point. That's what the Samsung U820 says to the world. Barely a blip on our radar when we came across the FCC filing at the beginning of the year, this QWERTY slider features a 3-inch WQVGA touchscreen, 3.2 megapixel still camera with video capture, headset jack, MicroSD card slot, browser, the Communities social networking widget, and for your UI (dis)satisfaction, TouchWiz 2.0. Available at the end of April 30 in the $80 - $100 range on Verizon.Samsung debuts U820 QWERTY slider at CTIA, no one notices originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 25 Mar 2010 15:11:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds. <h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6>Permalink SlashPhone | CNET | Email this | Comments
  16. We've been hearing of OpenPeak devices for years, but the company is a little camera shy -- particularly because most of their products, like the Verizon Hub and O2 Joggler, are re-branded by carriers. However, the company seems to be getting behind its recently announced OpenTablet 7 in a big way, recently announcing a partnership with AT&T for data plans in the US. Neither party will confirm exact plan pricing, but we're getting the vibe that it will be "familiar" to folks who've seen iPad data pricing. The device itself is surprisingly well built -- not at all one of these dime-a-tablet jobs -- and the software is rather mature as well. OpenPeak claims to have "thousands of apps" for its platform that stretches across devices including phones, frames, and now a tablet, with a Linux-based platform with a Flash layer on top. Refreshingly for the tablet space, the UI isn't a bit laggy, and seems pretty far along, though we're promised even more polish as this thing nears market. We didn't check out a browser, and some elements like the touchscreen keyboard are pretty dismal, but for home automation or video conferencing (the device packs a 1080p front-facing camera and a 5 megapixel shooter around back), it seems like OpenPeak can carve a niche for itself on the market. Most of all, we're impressed with the 1.9GHz Moorestown chip under the hood, which offers huge power savings over Atom; plenty of juice for some media rich apps, UI elements, and video; and even runs cool to the touch. An included docking station offers charging and port replication, but there's also an HDMI plug built right into the bottom of the tablet, along with removable microSD up top. No word on when exactly this will hit the market this year, how much it'll cost, or if it'll be rebranded by AT&T. Check out a video hands-on after the break, and a quick note on the press shots below: apps are subject to change based on the rebadger's own partnerships. Gallery: OpenPeak's OpenTablet 7 hands-on Gallery: OpenPeak's OpenTablet 7 press shots Continue reading OpenPeak's OpenTablet 7 hands-on: Moorestown has found a friend OpenPeak's OpenTablet 7 hands-on: Moorestown has found a friend originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 25 Mar 2010 14:48:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds. <h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6>Permalink | | Email this | Comments
  17. No big surprise here, but Microsoft is bringing its full Project Natal setup to the E3 games show in LA this year, with a "world premiere" event on Sunday, June 13th, followed by a media briefing on Monday the 14th. It's good to know they're on track for showing this off, after a no-show at the PlayStation Move-dominated GDC, and we'll of course be there in force, waving our arms around like we just don't care. From the looks of our invite, which puts the name "Project Natal" in quotes, we're not convinced that's even the final name for the device, but we suppose we'll find out for sure in June. Microsoft promises this will be our "first look at the future of fun," and we imagine some near-final hardware and beta game experiences will be on display as well. No word in the invite, but we imagine a Fall launch is still in the cards, with Jonathan Ross's "October" tweet as the most recent morsel on that front.Project Natal 'experience' to premiere at E3 on June 13th originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 25 Mar 2010 14:24:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds. <h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6>Permalink | | Email this | Comments
  18. When we first saw the ASUS O!Play Air set-top box the latter part of last year, we were interested -- when looking for a networked media player, it's definitely good to have options. Now that the kids at Bit-Tech have got their hands on a review unit, however, are enthusiasm has dampened quite a bit. Sure, it looks good in print: HDMI 1.3, composite video and audio output (for lovers of antiques), eSATA and USB ports, CF, SD+MMC, MS+MS Duo card readers, and 802.11n -- none too shabby, eh? Once you got past the "greasy plastic outer surface," however, things were not so awesome. The interface felt "sluggish" as the reviewer "repeatedly watching the timer... waiting for menus to load," and the device itself eschews support for Dolby TrueHD and DTS MasterHD in lieu of multichannel HD LPCM audio over HDMI -- a tongue twister for sure, but also a deal-breaker for some. On the other hand, the kids did find the the UI intuitive, and an automatic media preview especially helpful for wonky filenames. The question remains -- is it worth it for $130?ASUS O!Play AIR reviewed, deemed 'capable' originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 25 Mar 2010 14:07:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds. <h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6>Permalink | Bit-Tech | Email this | Comments
  19. Digital picture frames have long since moved passed being simple photo frames, and it looks like an increasing number are now pushing photos all the way to end of their list of features. One such device is this so-called Mojito WiFi display from Blue Lounge, which will handle photos and videos just fine, but is primarily designed to pull content from Facebook, Twitter and other social media (in addition to news and weather). That's then displayed in your "LifeStream," which can apparently be customized to your liking, and browsed with the included remote if you don't feel like letting everything cycle through (no touchscreen here). Still no firm word on availability, but the 7-inch display will supposedly demand $299 whenever it rolls out. Mojito WiFi display aggregates social media, works of Ernest Hemingway originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 25 Mar 2010 13:44:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds. <h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6>Permalink I4U News | SlashGear, MyMojito | Email this | Comments
  20. Qwest for years has sent their lawyers after communities who, unhappy with Qwest service, wanted to deploy their own broadband. They've fought against Seattle's attempt to deploy fiber. They've been particularly aggressive in the state of Utah, where the telco sued the Utopia FTTH project in an effort to prevent them from using regional utility poles. Qwest's Utah President, Jerry Fenn, informed the press that Qwest was fighting the project because they were worried about "the long-term harm to consumers." Back in 2003, Fenn asked the question: "Why provide a Rolls-Royce when a Chevrolet will do?" "Why provide a Rolls-Royce when a Chevrolet will do?"<br clear=all"/> Qwest executive Jerry FennThe problem has been that Qwest never offered many of these communities a serious alternative. With no wireless division to buoy income, Qwest has been very lax in upgrading their network, instead focusing on dressing up the company for possible sale. While that pleases investors who want an immediate return on their investment, it leaves customers with sub-par service and doesn't do much for the company's future fortunes. Qwest does offer VDSL service to a limited part of their footprint, but those speeds top out at 40 Mbps. Only 14% (420,000) of Qwest broadband customers have Qwest's fiber to the node service. 100 meg is just a dream.<br clear=all"/> -Qwest CEO Edward MuellerThis week finds Qwest eager to finally deliver faster speeds to rural customers -- provided the taxpayer is willing to foot the bill. Qwest today issued a press statement saying they were applying for $350 million in federal stimulus funds to help them deploy 12 to 40 Mbps VDSL service to about half a million homes, schools, businesses and hospitals. Qwest recently claimed 100 Mbps service was "just a dream," but they can apparently do 40 Mbps with a lot of help:The total cost of the proposed deployment would be $467 million. Qwest is requesting a grant for $350 million from the Broadband Initiatives Program (BIP), which is administered by the Rural Utilities Service, an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). When Congress enacted the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act last year, it directed the USDA to establish a program that would stimulate broadband deployment to hard-to-serve rural areas. The BIP provides 75 percent of the build-out costs. The remaining 25 percent, or $117 million, would be funded by Qwest.Qwest previously had stated that they could offer 95% of their customers 7 Mbps DSL service for a cool billion, but then Qwest failed to apply for the first round of funding. As we mentioned then, it seems a little counterproductive to give Qwest taxpayer money for network builds they were unwilling to do. Consider this again: we'd be giving taxpayer money to a company that spent millions of dollars fighting towns and cities from using taxpayer money to wire themselves when Qwest wouldn't. read comment(s) <br clear=all>
  21. We noticed a minor textual change on the JooJoo order page just a few days back, and apparently it was no mistake -- Fusion Garage has announced today that its long-awaited tablet PC has started to ship from the factory. For those who pre-ordered (and stuck with it), they'll get theirs as early as March 29th, while everyone can get in line by plopping down their $499 after the fact. So, who all here is fully anticipating seeing their Joojoo arrive on Monday? Anyone taking a sick day in order to enjoy it? Don't fret -- we won't tell.Continue reading JooJoo tablet now shipping, should greet US consumers on March 29th JooJoo tablet now shipping, should greet US consumers on March 29th originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 25 Mar 2010 11:28:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds. <h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6>Permalink | | Email this | Comments
  22. This Robovie isn't a dexterous grabber, a powerful computer or a walking tank like its Vstone counterparts. No, at first blush, the Robovie-mr2 is just your average designer Japanese cutebot, albeit one with an iPod Touch for a heart, but that's exactly why this one foot tall bot makes the perfect spycam. No one would suspect it hides 18 servo motors, a miniature CCD camera, speakers and microphone inside its demure, puppy dog exterior (hear it speak Japanese after the break), much less that you can directly control every movement over WiFi. And even should they catch your Robovie eavesdropping, they'd be hard pressed to execute a being with such powerful charm. Hit up the gallery if you don't believe us -- this robot knows just how to beg for its life. Gallery: Robovie-mR2 iPod-controlled robot Continue reading Robovie-mR2's puppy dog eyes make it the perfect spy Robovie-mR2's puppy dog eyes make it the perfect spy originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 25 Mar 2010 10:56:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds. <h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6>Permalink Plastic Pals | robovie-mR2 (JP) | Email this | Comments
  23. Back in October of 2008, Comcast implemented a 250 GB usage limit for all broadband subscribers. In December of 2009 Comcast finally released their usage meter, which allows users to track their consumption via the Comcast portal. The meter first appeared in Portland, but has recently been expanding into new markets very quickly. Comcast tells Broadband Reports the meter is now in "all or parts of" 25 states, including OR, WA, MA, MN, WI, NE, NH, NY, CT, VM, AR, KS, MO, CO, UT, AL, FL, GA, TN, SC, DE, MD, PA, WV, VA and DC. Comcast couldn't specify how many users they've reached, but stated it's "many multiples of millions of customers." "Our goal is to get it out nationally as soon as we can," Comcast's Charlie Douglas tells us. read comment(s) <br clear=all>
  24. It strikes us as we post this that perhaps you need to be something of a Crapgadget connoiseur to understand the attraction that Kisai's Escape C wireless Bluetooth receiver holds for us. Available from Tokyo Flash (one of our favorite CG purveyors) the thing does serve a purpose: it'll receive Bluetooth from your phone, laptop, or whatever, and let you listen to music and / or answer calls with your non-Bluetooth headset. But, as always, the devil is in the details -- not only does the build quality look especially sub-par, but the way that they've re-imagined what should be a simple time display into a brain-teaser (hit the source link for that one) is totally hilarious -- and totally Crapgadget. Did we mention that this thing is $106? Not laughing now, are you?Kisai's Escape C Bluetooth receiver is very expensive, very Crapgadget originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 25 Mar 2010 10:33:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds. <h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6>Permalink | Tokyo Flash | Email this | Comments
  25. What's this you say, your clothes would be better off if they weren't strewn all over the floor, but you just don't know how to maintain them airborne sans magical abilities? Fear not, we've finally found a hanger worthy of a true gadget geek in the retro styled 8-bit pointer you see above. There's not an overwhelming amount of complexity to it -- hell, even the one screw that holds the finger to the wall is permanently attached -- but nothing communicates your tech credentials quite like a pixelated mouse cursor from yesteryear. Available now for $19.99 a piece plus shipping.8-bit hanger is a gravity-defying, geek-gratifying implement of mass distraction originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 25 Mar 2010 10:10:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds. <h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6>Permalink Wired | Meninos | Email this | Comments
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