Jump to content

Surge protection and ground


Le_Murphant
 Share

Recommended Posts

I just moved into my new apartment and realized that there was no "ground" plugs anywhere. The whole apartment is not grounded. So I purchased a surge protectors to protect my electronic stuff, but I was wondering if it was enough. I'm actually not too sure how surge protectors work. I could invest quite a bit of time and ground it if it ended up being necessary to protect my equipment.

Link to post
Share on other sites

now that you mention this and i look down, my surge protector has a light saying when its grounded...and its not on...but i havent had any problems and you shouldn't either. just unplug stuff when there is a storm and stuff like that...at least its what i do and i've never had anything fry.

Ok, now its time for some other members to come in and give him a detailed answer.

Link to post
Share on other sites

while there are some suppressors that run a series circuit layout that stores the spike and releases it gradually that don't need a ground circuit to function i will figure you got the el cheapo brand that simply dumps any excess voltage onto the ground.

this is of course, as php stated, rendered entirely useless by the state of your wiring.

if indeed you have no grounded outlets in your apartment i would go ahead and contact the people responsible for this sad state and dispense merry hell on a democratic basis until this dangerous condition is resolved.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just moved into my new apartment and realized that there was no "ground" plugs anywhere. The whole apartment is not grounded. So I purchased a surge protectors to protect my electronic stuff, but I was wondering if it was enough. I'm actually not too sure how surge protectors work. I could invest quite a bit of time and ground it if it ended up being necessary to protect my equipment.

How old is this apartment? Everything has to be grounded. how sure are you that nothing is grounded? Have you opened a outlet to check for your self?

And as php said, if the outlet isnet grounded then then a surge protector isnt going to help.

Link to post
Share on other sites

They never used to have that extra ground wire, until they finally realized why mom died from makin toast,and opening the fridge that had faulty wiring .

  Find the first receptacle in the circuit (the one first in line from the breaker or fuse panel) and hook it to the "line" side of the GFCI. Then connect the wire going to the remaining outlets on that circuit to the "load" side of the device. Now you can replace all the remaining outlets on that circuit with regular three-prong grounded outlets.

You can get them for between 10- 30 $$ or so, depending on the amperage your gonna be drawing on that circuit. If you don't know what your doin, don't do it! You may die, and or other people may as well as a result of an electrical fire or who knows what.

.

Link to post
Share on other sites

A ground is really not hard to hook up. Especially if you have any metal water lines. Just put a clamp on it and there is your ground.

Too simple. Even  I could do it.  :uglystupid2:

exactly, but you must hook to a cold water line, due to the fact the water heater may have a dielectric fitting , therefor insulating the connection.
Link to post
Share on other sites

Your problem being Reso, is it is not illegal to not have grounded wiring. In no book that I know of. It is called the grandfather clause. Now I do install GFI's in my rental kitchens and bath's, but no where is it a requirement.

You might ask real nicely for good obvious reasons, but that is it.  :wink:

Link to post
Share on other sites

I did indeed get relatively cheap surge protection (sub 30$) so I think it could be worth it to ground. If I can get the home owner to refund me, I will, but it won't be that expensive anyways. I'l probably get grounded on water heaters tho, but mudmanc4, were you saying this could be a bad idea? Seems to me like there is quite a bit of metal on there, enough to ground a plug.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I did indeed get relatively cheap surge protection (sub 30$) so I think it could be worth it to ground. If I can get the home owner to refund me, I will, but it won't be that expensive anyways. I'l probably get grounded on water heaters tho, but mudmanc4, were you saying this could be a bad idea? Seems to me like there is quite a bit of metal on there, enough to ground a plug.

Just make sure it is on the cold side of the water lines. And as mentioned ask your landlord first, he might be a realnice guy if asked first. As far as reimbursing you, I wouldn't unless I were asked first. (I am a landlord)
Link to post
Share on other sites

but mudmanc4, were you saying this could be a bad idea? Seems to me like there is quite a bit of metal on there, enough to ground a plug.

You need to take the ground all the way to the ground, thats why they call it a ground. The amount of metal has no meaning , if the short cannot be earthed. This is why I suggested the cold water line, even in the old days, they still had a ground wire running from the cold water line, near where the main enters the house........somewhere. But like Tommie and Res said, you better talk to your landlord dude, you could be askin for trouble, and alot of it really.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you need to read your lease.It will probably say all such repairs are to go through the building suprintendent even if you are willing to hire a professional electrician & pay for it yourself.Even if you get permission get it in writing .

You could probably check a few things yourself if you know what you are doing just don't tell the super.Turn off the circuit breaker to the closest plugin.You need to have a multimeter(A cheap Walmart one will do.) remove the plugin plate,then the plugin.I think you will find an electric cable with 3 wires.A white wire(common).a black wire (hot) & a ground wire.It probably won't be insulated(with plastic).I bet they just used the cheap ungrounded plugin & a ground wire is actually available.If this is what you find set the multimeter to ohms to check continuity between the white wire & the ground wire if it has continuity then you have a ground wire.You just need to get the super to install the correct plugins(don't tell him you know the ground wire is there.

If you are more experienced then turn the current back on & check the voltage between the black & white wire setting the multimeter to read AC current.It should be between 115 &125V. Then check between the black wire & the ground wire it should read the same.

If you only have 2 wire electric cable you are out of luck.Unless the building is really old I can't imagine it has only 2 wire.If it does it is probably a building code violation & should be reported to code enforcement.This can usually be done anomously.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...