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Guest ExtremeFusion

Ubuntu Installation

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Guest ExtremeFusion

Guys, i recently received my FREE copy of Ubuntu (open source) OS..

I wanted to try it, but afraid it will be incompatible or make my existing system unstable..

I have two physical Hard Disk

1. 40 GB Seagate

2. 80 GB Seagate

My 40 and 80 GB Seagate is in NTFS windows format.

My 40 GB Seagate is solely use as system disk (OS, Programs, Anti-virus, etc.)

My 80 GB Seagate is partitioned into two..

One is for my Personal Files, Effects, Data and so on

The other one is reserved as a storage of ghost image (backup) of my system disk.

My question is this:

Can I Install ubuntu in my system, specifically in my partitioned hard disk (i am planning to install it in my partition, that holds my system backup files (this backup files will then be moved to my other partiton that holds my personal files.)?

Would it not affect my existing OS?

Will I be able to dual boot my system?

Would it not overwrite the existing partition on my 80 GB Seagate or affect my personal files since I would be installing it on a partitioned hard disk?

Will I be able to install it in NTFS windows format hard disk?!

Sorry, If  I have too many questions..

just wanna make sure before I do something that I should have consulted to other first..

Just being safe...

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Guest ExtremeFusion

1. Yes, you can install it on a certain partition.

2. Yes, it would not affect the existing OS.

3. Yes, you could Dual-Boot. I do.

4. Unsure of what you mean.

5. Yes, it can be installed in FAT or NTFS

Thanks a lot..

You are unsure of numba 4?

!

well i kinda get lost with my English, i mean the way i really want it to deliver(my thought) is somewhat changed when i use English as my medium of communication..

Since English is not my native tounge, it's hard for me to exemplify things...

But what can i do, this is an english forum...

BTW, what I meant on numba 4 is this:

If i install it (Ubuntu) in a hard disk which has two partition (partition A & B, for example),

none of which (partition) is use as a system drive.

Will it overwrite anything that is on partition B, if I installed it on partition A?

And one more thing

Does Ubuntu, use the same partition manager as windows too (in nature, perhaps)?!

Can it recognize the partition the windows (XP) made?

If it can't then it will overwrite my existing partition, right?

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Thanks a lot..

You are unsure of numba 4?

!

well i kinda get lost with my English, i mean the way i really want it to deliver(my thought) is somewhat changed when i use English as my medium of communication..

Since English is not my native tounge, it's hard for me to exemplify things...

But what can i do, this is an english forum...

BTW, what I meant on numba 4 is this:

If i install it (Ubuntu) in a hard disk which has two partition (partition A & B, for example),

none of which (partition) is use as a system drive.

Will it overwrite anything that is on partition B, if I installed it on partition A?

And one more thing

Does Ubuntu, use the same partition manager as windows too (in nature, perhaps)?!

Can it recognize the partition the windows (XP) made?

If it can't then it will overwrite my existing partition, right?

It will recognize it and I dont think it will overwrite the other no.

I have Ubuntu installed and it's partition manager is a lot different then XP's but works the same way.

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yes, ubuntu has a different kind of partition manager. but to keep on the safe side, try using gparted. it is a nice partition manager/editor that works well with windows and linux. look here http://gparted.sourceforge.net/

what is your version of ubuntu? mine is feisty. i also dual boot mine with windows. if your copy is new, i would guess that it would be gutsy gibbon. well, whatever the version, i hope you havethe alternate install cd. installing with the live cd gave me some problems, which i didn't have on the alternate install.

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yes, ubuntu has a different kind of partition manager. but to keep on the safe side, try using gparted. it is a nice partition manager/editor that works well with windows and linux. look here http://gparted.sourceforge.net/

what is your version of ubuntu? mine is feisty. i also dual boot mine with windows. if your copy is new, i would guess that it would be gutsy gibbon. well, whatever the version, i hope you havethe alternate install cd. installing with the live cd gave me some problems, which i didn't have on the alternate install.

I installed Gutsy Gibbon with the live CD and got perfect results.

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Guest ExtremeFusion

yes, ubuntu has a different kind of partition manager. but to keep on the safe side, try using gparted. it is a nice partition manager/editor that works well with windows and linux. look here http://gparted.sourceforge.net/

what is your version of ubuntu? mine is feisty. i also dual boot mine with windows. if your copy is new, i would guess that it would be gutsy gibbon. well, whatever the version, i hope you havethe alternate install cd. installing with the live cd gave me some problems, which i didn't have on the alternate install.

Yes version 7.10

Yes it is a Live CD

and Yes it give me problem in installing (due to it, i abandoned installation)

The problem goes something like this "no root blah blah detected on the selected partition, :wtf:)

I don't know how to fix this...

Where did you got the alternate install?

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Yes version 7.10

Yes it is a Live CD

and Yes it give me problem in installing (due to it, i abandoned installation)

The problem goes something like this "no root blah blah detected on the selected partition, :wtf:)

I don't know how to fix this...

Where did you got the alternate install?

  I have never actually seen any statements say " blah blah " ,  care to quote what it really says? It tends to be helpful when diagnosing issues.    Please help us help you : ).

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Guest ExtremeFusion

I couldn't remember exactly what it says..

But when I am in one of the 7 steps in installing ubuntu..

A particular steps in that, warns me about a "root" not being able to be detected in my partitions...

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I couldn't remember exactly what it says..

But when I am in one of the 7 steps in installing ubuntu..

A particular steps in that, warns me about a "root" not being able to be detected in my partitions...

I think there trying to say there is no root partition. Did you set the partitions manually?

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Guest ExtremeFusion

I think there trying to say there is no root partition. Did you set the partitions manually?

yep, i want it (ubuntu) to use my existing partition

Letting it to automatically set its own partition would be fatal for may case, it'll overwrite my existing system or files...

BTW, can i install it on my drive c: without my existing OS being overwritten?!

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before you install it, defragment your HD first so that all your files is in the beginning of of the HD, then make a partition in the end part of the HD.

installing it on its own, separate partition is the safest way to go. don't even try to install it on your c drive, it will overwrite windows.

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before you install it, defragment your HD first so that all your files is in the beginning of of the HD, then make a partition in the end part of the HD.

installing it on its own, separate partition is the safest way to go. don't even try to install it on your c drive, it will overwrite windows.

Not always...I installed it on a Win 2K drive and 2K is still there.

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yep, i want it (ubuntu) to use my existing partition

Letting it to automatically set its own partition would be fatal for may case, it'll overwrite my existing system or files...

BTW, can i install it on my drive c: without my existing OS being overwritten?!

  One of the freat things about a linux distro is, they detect other partitions. If you were aware of them , and noted the size and whereabouts, you can decipher what the partition manager is stating.

The Idea of a defrag is valid, yet many times if configured properly, the linux partition will move the files on it's own, maybe not where they go ,but out of the way none the less.

If you have concern about losing files, simply use windows explorer to drag any and all files needed into a new burn folder for cd/dvd media.

By selecting the expert install, this is telling the system installer that you know what you are doing, remember all those questions you knew nothing about? Or very little ?

Just save your files,  do not overwrite " C: "  and you should pay attention to the partitions chosen.

If you want to learn to set partitions yourself, thats great! do a bit of investigating. You don't have to be a computer scientist to learn about swaps ,risers,extended, roots,  ect.., besides, it's fun!

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  One of the freat things about a linux distro is, they detect other partitions. If you were aware of them , and noted the size and whereabouts, you can decipher what the partition manager is stating.

The Idea of a defrag is valid, yet many times if configured properly, the linux partition will move the files on it's own, maybe not where they go ,but out of the way none the less.

If you have concern about losing files, simply use windows explorer to drag any and all files needed into a new burn folder for cd/dvd media.

By selecting the expert install, this is telling the system installer that you know what you are doing, remember all those questions you knew nothing about? Or very little ?

Just save your files,  do not overwrite " C: "  and you should pay attention to the partitions chosen.

If you want to learn to set partitions yourself, thats great! do a bit of investigating. You don't have to be a computer scientist to learn about swaps ,risers,extended, roots,  ect.., besides, it's fun!

Exactly!

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