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Guest ExtremeFusion

1 GHz to 3 GHz

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Guest ExtremeFusion

Hi guys, it's been a while since I last log in here...

I'm planning to experiment on O'cing.. and i remembered there is a post here about

an Intel processor something stock as 1.XX GHz that can be oc'ed up to 3 GHz..

But I can't remember the thread name and I can't find the thread..

Could somebody help me on this?

Thank you..

If not..

I would like to know what is the Cheapest Intel Processor that I could buy (for socket LGA 775) and can be safely and conveniently overclocked to 2.4 - 3.0 GHz

And what Cooling devices should i pair with them so they don't get toast in that setup..

BTW, If i OC'ed my Processor

Do i need to OC'ed my Video Card, RAM and the likes?

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My edit didn't make it into the first post in time so here's what I wanted to say...

BTW, If i OC'ed my Processor

Do i need to OC'ed my Video Card, RAM and the likes?

The video card is independent and it's frequencies are not related to the cpu.  Thus you don't need to OC it.  Since cpu speed = (bus x multiplier) and RAM = (bus x ratio) they are related.  If the multiplier & ratio stayed the same, and the FSB went up both the ram and the cpu would be overclocked.  Thus you now have 3 choices:  1. Buy overclockers ram.  2. Lower the ratio of RAM:FSB to prevent the higher fsb from making your ram run beyond spec.  3. Buy a Nvidia or other motherboard that allows the fsb and ram to be unlinked.

My suggestion is to buy DDR2 800 ram (PC2 6400), and here's why.  First some specs. :grin2:  If I get anything wrong feel free to correct me.

(bus x multiplier) = CPU speed                      200mhz x 9 = 1.8Ghz on the E2160

(bus x 4) = FSB                                          200mhz x 4 = 800mhz Fsb

(bus : ram) = ratio                                        200mhz : 400mhz = 1:2 (bus to ram ratio)                               

DDR2 800 ram tells you that the ram works at 400 mhz and it is Dual Data Rate (800mhz).  If your bus is at 200mhz and your ram is rated for 400mhz all you have to do is set FSB:RAM ratio at 1:2.  This would result in cpu at 1.8Ghz and ram at 400mhz.

Now lets say that your shooting for 3Ghz.  Since the multiplier is locked at 9, raising the fsb to 333mhz would give 9 x 333mhz = 3Ghz.  If you forgot to change the ratio from its previous 1:2 your ram (rated at 400mhz) would probably fail to operate at 666mhz.  By changing the ratio to 4:5 the ram would be at (333 x 1.25) = 416mhz and should be happy.

Now since you have exceptional cooling your going for 3.6Ghz.  That would be achieved by (400mhz x 9).  Well hey thats convenient your ram is rated for 400mhz.  Set the ratio to 1:1 and you got cpu at 3.6ghz with 400mhz ram running at 400mhz.  Now all you need is a mother board that can do bus speed 400mhz as most well made boards can.

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Guest ExtremeFusion

Thanks Blako...

I just wanted to try OCing without hurting my pocket that much..

hehe

Just have to do tons of homework about it... :cheesy:

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imo the brand isn't as important as the specs of the specific module. and overclocking is always hit or miss.

for example, the different speeds of cpus of the same type are due to final testing in manufacturing. while making a say 3 ghz cpu the mfr will end up with a bunch of cpus that will not run at that speed due to flaws in production. these are then tested at lower speeds and sold as a lower rated cpu.

overclocking relies on the fact that a chip that is classed as x will run 100% stable at that speed. by putting it out of its spec by raising the voltage and clock speed. well cooled it might run stable at the new speed or not. trial and error will give you the speed at which you can run your compionents at with an amount of stability problems you can live with.

bear in mind that any overclocking will usually risk damaging components by stressing them too much.

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Guest ExtremeFusion

Thanks resopalrabotnick..

Currently I am working in OC'ing an old Northwood P4 2.4 GHz 533 fsb

Unfortunately the bios just have the option in changing the FSB..

no Vcore Adjustment and

PCI AGP divider adjustment..

Dunno if the board automatically locks the PCI and AGP to run at 33 and 66

This doesn't surprise me because the board is a AsRock GE-Pro M2 utilizing Sis 651 Chipset

Is there a good software there that can change Vcore, and lock the AGP and PCI clocks in windows environment?

Or should i just stick with what my bios offers me?

I also tried OCing its mid graphic card Inno3d GeForce FX5500, but its lock to forceware.. i fiddled with it and adjusted the clock and memory  to +10 default is 270 & 332..

Then i restarted the computer.. and WTF

it says an error about pci.sys and some dlls that could not load..

I removed the graphic card and put my monitor on the onboard VGA..

still same warning..

Then I tried cleaning the contact pins of the RAM.. and by the way the RAM that should be read as 512mb

(2 x 256mb) is read by the motherboard in somewhat 498mb.. hmm.. i'm planning to run Memtest to see if the RAM is the culprit...

and when i tried removing one of the RAM module.. the computer booted.. ehmmm...  [nerdly]

Do you think the RAM is causing all this OS load failures.. I did make it past thru bios post...

And if I did mess up with the card which is way too impossible how do i change back to the original settings.. I already uninstalled RivaTuner (the program i use to OC FX5500) and put the card on the box..

I'm currently using onboard VGA..

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Guest ExtremeFusion

So far so good..  :azn:

Oc'ed the 2.4 Ghz Northwood P4 ------> 2.74 Ghz

PCI clock's default is 32 now set ------> 94

No RAM Voltage Adjustment, And Vcore Adjustment..

Running all on stock cooling..

24hx9.jpg

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not to rain on your parade, and congrats on getting it figurd out, but take a look at those numbers and think it over.

you are running the components out of spec with stock cooling. the added heat (be sure to look at any temp monitoring options you have, and remember, temp at idle <> temp at load) may well cause immediate or delayed problems.

having oc'ed the cpu as you stated means you are running it 340 MHz over what intel says it will reliably do (and remember, they test them after making a batch to see how fast they will go to determine the highest price they can charge (faster = mo' money) this is why the fastest chips of a new model are much more expensive when they first come out, manufacturing has to be brought up to speed and any kinks ironed out to increase the percentage of higher clocked chips gleaned from each batch)

but that absolute increase of 340 MHz only gets you a theoretical maximum increase in speed of ~7%. (due to other factors this theoretical increase is never really experienced in the wild)

so you can upgrade cooling to increase your safety margin or simply take the money that would cost, put it in the bank, put the box back to stock settings and save for a major upgrade down the road.

then again, no risk, no fun... :twisted:

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you are running the components out of spec with stock cooling. the added heat (be sure to look at any temp monitoring options you have, and remember, temp at idle <> temp at load) may well cause immediate or delayed problems.

while I agree the stock cooling of any P4 is horrible, as long as it runs below 60-70c at full load it'll be fine. Besides, he'll notice when the CPU starts throttling, and even that happens before the heat does permanent damage.

having oc'ed the cpu as you stated means you are running it 340 MHz over what intel says it will reliably do (and remember, they test them after making a batch to see how fast they will go to determine the highest price they can charge (faster = mo' money) this is why the fastest chips of a new model are much more expensive when they first come out, manufacturing has to be brought up to speed and any kinks ironed out to increase the percentage of higher clocked chips gleaned from each batch)

You seem to put a lot of faith in the specs given by a manufacturer, while they really aren't absolute. The Pentium D (two P4s stuck on one PCB) could run at 3.5 - 4 Ghz comfortably. Though I should add that if you didn't have a golden sample it'd be using like 200W at 4 Ghz, especially with increased voltage. As long as he runs at stock voltage, the increased speed won't add much to the heat output and required amperage.

but that absolute increase of 340 MHz only gets you a theoretical maximum increase in speed of ~7%. (due to other factors this theoretical increase is never really experienced in the wild)

Free speed.

so you can upgrade cooling to increase your safety margin or simply take the money that would cost, put it in the bank, put the box back to stock settings and save for a major upgrade down the road.

Free speed. As long as you keep it within margins you'll upgrade before it deteriorates anyway. Not to mention that you can put it back to stock when it starts to fail at OCed speeds.

then again, no risk, no fun... :twisted:

Totally agreed. :twisted:

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Guest ExtremeFusion

Yes I do agree with all your inputs..

It's an old processor anyway.. at least before I try OCing newer chips.. I now know how to do it..

I did my homework Before I tried OCing the Processor..

But to my disappointment, the board has options only for changing Bus Speed and PCI Clocks.. which limits my OCing..

I don't want to try window base OCing software to tweak my Vcore and RAM.. I dunno the ramification If i do it and how to revert in Case of a Fail Boot or OC...

Whenever the Processor can't handle the Bus Speed the Mobo prevents the system from booting.. when it does I just simply reset the bios and viola and I'm back again..

Is there a possible way to OC an old mid-level graphic card Nvidia Inno3d GeForce FX5500?

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It seems that overclocking RAM gives the least performence boost.  Such as doubling the ram speed makes games run 1% faster.  All the big name Ram can run above spec, all be it with added voltage.  I wanted to add that the e2160 cpu can be overclocked from 1.8Ghz to 2.8Ghz and the e8400 cpu can be overclocked from 3Ghz to 3.6Ghz without added voltage.  In these situations the cpu temps are nearly identical to stock.

ExtremeFusion, can you notice the overclock on your P4?  Do your programs run faster?

PCSTATS Maximum Overclocking Charts, Ram, Motherboard, Cpu, and Video card.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/cpu-cooler-charts-2008,1779.html

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/cpu-cooler-charts-2008-part-2,1782.html

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Guest ExtremeFusion

it runs a little faster than before had to go to P4 2.6 OC speed.. i might have messed up with my previous OC..

It fails Prime95 tests

2.6 seem to be stable so far..

Still finding OC tools for OCing my RAM and mid level graphic card..

I like to play with it just before i buy a new rig.. and OC it..

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You seem to put a lot of faith in the specs given by a manufacturer, while they really aren't absolute. The Pentium D (two P4s stuck on one PCB) could run at 3.5 - 4 Ghz comfortably. Though I should add that if you didn't have a golden sample it'd be using like 200W at 4 Ghz, especially with increased voltage. As long as he runs at stock voltage, the increased speed won't add much to the heat output and required amperage.

I put faith in the fact that if intel sells a cpu rated at e.s then that is the speed they will guarantee it to run properly at.

anything beyond that puts it into a state that might work, but fails to meet intels criteria for everyday operation.

I also put faith in the fact that if a cpu will run at a certain speed reliably intel will not rate it at a lower speed, because thatwould cost them money.

as for your example of the p4d, it just shows what I said. you might be able to run a cpu far beyond specs but in your example that would mean more than doubling the thermal load. and that would require some robust cooling to prevent frying the cpu.

and I am jusr cautioning as I would caution someone that told me he was looking to install a large turbo kit on some compact riceburner. yes, it can be done. but it will decrease engine life and heavily stress the rest of the car. it is a tradeoff.

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I use Rivatuner to oc my video card You can give that a try, just make sure you DO NOT check the box that says start with windows. That way if your overclock is to much all you have to do is reboot. Also when you OC your video card raise it  +2 and only do the gpu first then do the memory.Make sure you keep a eye on the temperature of the card,It can climb up real fast when you are gaming.

As for the ram leave it alone. You will have more problems then it worth. I OC my X3350 to 3504MHZ but my ram is still running 1:1 with the FSB. Click on the CPU-z banner in my sig it will show you my OC. By keeping the ram at 1:1  my ram is actually underclocked it running at 876 instead of 1066. By doing this I was able to tighten the timing from 5-5-5-20 to 4-4-4-10.

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Guest ExtremeFusion

How do i check for my GPU's temp?

What program should I use?

@Buntz

You mean I must first OC my GPU core clock afterwards its Memory Clock?

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Guest ExtremeFusion

thanks coknuck

BTW, somehow RivaTuner has greyed out the first option for OCing the Card I can only OC by forceware..

can't get a screenie for now..

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Guest ExtremeFusion

Yeah I did.. gonna try it..

WTF..

My bios doesn't allow me to change Vcore..  :tickedoff:

Only left to OC is the midlevel graphic card..

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