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dlewis23

Torrentspy Sues MPAA for Hiring Hacker

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Its about Dam Time someone sues them

CNET is running an interesting report this morning that accuses the MPAA of hiring a hacker to break into the network of the Torrent search website TorrentSpy. Valence Media, the company behind the search portal, claims "an associate" was paid $15,000 to steal e-mail correspondence and trade secrets. "These claims are false," says Kori Bernards, the MPAA's vice president of corporate communications. "Torrentspy is trying to obscure the facts to hide the fact that they are facilitating thievery."

Full Story: http://news.com.com/2100-1030_3-6076665.html?part=rss&tag=6076665&subj=news

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The TPM chip was created by a large group of over one hundred companies, led by AMD, Hewlett-Packard, IBM, Microsoft, and Sun. These chips are part of the PC hardware, permanently assigning a unique identifier to each computer

i don't like that. :angry5:

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The RIAA's Latest PR Strategy: Gibberish

News.com sat down for an interview with Cary Sherman and Mitch Bainwol, the president and chairman, respectively, of the RIAA, who did little to improve their maligned reputations. When asked if they regret suing people like 12-year-old girls and grandmothers, Sherman says yes, and that they're "feeling pretty good", then goes on with some lines that pay lip service to the idea that they're interested in coming up with new business models, rather than just using litigation as the cornerstone of their strategy. The most egregious comment, though, comes from Bainwol, who says "nobody" has any problem with DRM and copy protection. While consumers might not know what DRM is, they know when they songs they've purchased won't play on their new MP3 player, because it's not compatible, or when they can't burn a CD to their computer because a record label thinks they're a criminal, or when the copy protection on a CD opens their computer up to hackers. People understand the restrictions copy protection and DRM impose on them and content they've legally bought, even if they are unfamiliar with the term. Bainwol's belief that "nobody" has a problem with DRM fuels his efforts to mandate the use of copy protection by law, and it's a belief that [will] ultimately undo the music industry.

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