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  1. 3 points
    Hello @DESAND I am going to try to make this as less of a work as possible for you. (I think?) I assume you are running windows 7 or above... Open any folder anyway you like... or just directly file explorer... 1. On the address bar copy and paste this: Control Panel\Network and Internet\Network and Sharing Center Hit enter, and when you are the page I hope you are at. You should see what you are connected with. 2. Beside connection. you would see Ethernet or Wireless in blue. Click on it. 3. The window that pops up shows your hardware capabilities. This is the maximum your network card can go up to theoretically. (No way you'll hit this, even PC to PC direct transfer. As your other components w/ bottleneck the transfer of file transfers) Screenshot below for an example: As you can see my network card is 1000Mbps/Gbps capable. I don't get these speeds, but here we are :P Hope this is what you are asking for? Please clarify if it isn't. Cheers!
  2. 3 points
    CA3LE

    TMN on the News

    Awesome! Thank you Ken Colburn from Data Doctors. https://www.abc15.com/news/let-joe-know/paying-for-fast-speeds-why-is-your-computer-so-slow Another great article at KTAR - http://ktar.com/story/2530346/why-is-my-internet-slow-even-though-the-speed-test-says-it-is-fast/
  3. 2 points
    lbb

    Date Format Problem in downloaded CSV file

    Sean, Your solution worked! Thank you so much for sorting this mystery. I am in the UK so the date format is the same as for Ireland. Another slice of Excel knowledge gained by me . CA3LE - Yes please - if you can add the site option for the date format that will make it a whole lot easier for those of us on this side of the pond.
  4. 2 points
    I'm working on this right now actually. 😁 Very soon.
  5. 2 points
    The other day I was getting pissed off at my cell phone for running so slow. I was in the city where I used to get dwnld speeds of 50+Mbps. I ran a TMN speed test and was only getting on 2 attempts 15- 20 Mbps. I realized I hadn't cleared the cache and history on the phone in awhile. I forgot to look at how much was stored before clearing but took almost 10 mins. After clearing I ran a test and the download results were 56 Mbps I guess to be a Smartphone it has to have a smart user. :)
  6. 2 points
    CA3LE

    My Average Tool

    Thanks, I'm surprised there hasn't been more response to this. It's pretty much the most powerful tool I've ever built... statistically speaking. Personally, I love it. My Average also works with all of the ISPs, cities and countries in the database. Those areas are in development but will be released in iterations soon. I'm using it right now and... to me, it's crazy to see years of data plotted out in front of me, so quickly. Many of the queries aren't even close to optimized or indexed but it can still make it happen like lightning. Around 2011/2012 I changed the way providers were being logged to the database, this tool combines the old data with the new data for its calculations so I'm able to get full records going back to 2005. All in milliseconds. (actually the database predates that but an early error reset all of the dates to 2005... whoops! Too late by the time I noticed. Live, learn, be happy.) These are extremely heavy queries to the database but using some of the same strategies that I use for hoststats I'm able to make these pages render for you in under 0.05 seconds. Behind the scenes these queries take minutes but TMN is in the background pre-fetching and caching calculations. Check out how much Hughes Net has improved over the years. LOL, that 2nd video was copyright claimed for the audio before I could even post this. (I mean right as I pasted the link) Youtube is on it! That's good, that dude deserves credit. So you might see ads just on that 2nd video... just wanted to share what I was really listening to right now.
  7. 2 points
    Dave Taht

    Bufferbloat! (latency under load)

    Both the dslreports folk and fast.com reached out the the bloat email list (see lists.bufferbloat.net) as to how to go about measuring this problem properly in their codebases. You will find a lot of good info in the archives there, and we're always looking for sites to be actively testing for bufferbloat. Of the two, dslreports has thus far been doing a great job, so great that their dataset is thoroughly polluted by people that used the site to fix their bufferbloat!!, so we no longer have a real picture of what the internet is really looking like. (so I really, really, really applaud the idea of a new site, such as yours, attempting to tackle the problem also) I have a few nits on the dslreports stuff I've always wanted them to address, also. A few are: 0) huge threads on the bloat lists that I won't summarize... a noted one is the insistence on doing some level of statistical ledgerdemain on the data (throwing out the worst 5% of the data, or picking an arbitrary threshold of X latency for bufferbloat, etc. )When it comes to this sort of science, the *really* interesting data is in the outliers, not the averages. This is a detailed look at that sort of statistical rigor problem from a talk I gave at sigcomm 2014: http://conferences.sigcomm.org/sigcomm/2014/doc/slides/137.pdf (they've never invited me back) 1) Since the adoption of fq_codel in OSX, openwrt, thousands of commercial routers (notably now in Wifi - see google's implementation here: http://flent-newark.bufferbloat.net/~d/Airtime based queue limit for FQ_CoDel in wireless interface.pdf ) and the universal enablement of ECN in that OS, we are starting to see ECN negotation and CE markings show up in multiple data sets. It would be good to track that somewhere. 2) both dslreports and fast.com throw out too much data. The really core and scary bufferbloat problem is when a network is too congested to operate worth a dang in the first place. I keep hoping that someday dslreports, at least, will create a plot that just shows the data they currently throw out - an analogy of what we might discover is here: https://www.space.com/25945-cosmic-microwave-background-discovery-50th-anniversary.html 3) I really like the http://www.dslreports.com/speedtest/results/bufferbloat?up=1 plot - my kvetch is that it is only a 10 day most recent summary and I've had to rely on screen shots to be able to compare stuff over time. I'd long hoped for a deal where they could sell or share that dataset to researchers. The bufferbloat problem IS getting better - assuming the dslreports dataset isn't totally polluted but there is a long, long way to go. 4) Nobody's tests run long enough to saturate higher speed links, due to how slow TCP ramps up. A variable length test, or one that runs longer when it detects high bandwidth is in use. dslreports cuts off their data set and test with 4+ second delays - and we have seen delays as bad as hundreds of seconds in the field. 5) A really simple test would be to measure syn and syn/ack times while under load for a string of very short tcp transactions. This would emulate web traffic better. 6) Recently published (and under discussion on the bloat list) was a pretty good summary of the speedtest problems we have on the internet going forward. Discussion here; https://lists.bufferbloat.net/pipermail/bloat/2019-May/009211.html - the paper, here: https://arxiv.org/pdf/1905.02334.pdf Anyway, we're kind of old internet fogies that mostly use email, and not web forums like this, if you have further questions, want to gain testers, or have someone from the bufferbloat effort or academia help dissect the data, please drop us a line on bloat at lists.bufferbloat.net. Best of luck with it! Thx!
  8. 2 points
    Sean

    How does a WISP work?

    Some of the wireless internet service providers (WISPs) that operate here in Ireland operate on the 5GHz Wi-Fi band. This is basically like a home Wi-Fi set up, but on a much bigger scale. The purpose of the dish is provide a high enough gain to pick up and transmit the signal over a several mile radius. The tower usually consists of several sector antennas, typically three aimed 120 degrees apart operating on separate channels. Customers on one sector generally share the same channel like on a home Wi-Fi network. The last WISP I was with used Ubiquiti hardware. When I changed provider, I was curious myself to check out its web interface and to my surprise they never changed the default password on the dish hardware's web interface. Its configuration was very similar to home Wi-Fi, mainly an SSID, WPA2 passphrase and internal IP address set. Their service end likely had a gateway server that throttled the up/down bandwidth according to whatever package was ordered, while also metering the usage from the assigned IP address. Ubiquiti has a training book freely available on their website which goes into detail on how enterprise Wi-Fi works including on a large scale that WISPs use: https://dl.ubnt.com/guides/training/courses/UEWA_Training_Guide_V2.1.pdf A few other WISPs here use LTE on the licenced 3.6GHz band. This basically works the same as a mobile phone LTE service, but where the operator has exclusive control over its assigned spectrum, LTE hardware and installation. As this is a managed network, it generally performs a lot better than a mobile phone LTE network as each LTE client device (i.e. that dish antenna on the roof) is professionally installed, maximising the signal encoding efficiency. The weaker the signal quality, the more airtime is required to transmit the same amount of data.
  9. 1 point
    Sean

    How does a WISP work?

    The line of sight will depend on the distance from the transmitter. If it's nearby such as within a mile or two, it will may work fine with minor obstructions such as a tree or wall in the path, much like how 5GHz Wi-Fi can still penetrate walls. Most WISPs here operate on 3.6GHz (licenced) or 5GHz (using the 5GHz Wi-Fi band.) If the transmitter is far away such as 10+ miles or operates above 6GHz, it will need clear line of sight of the transmitter. This is a problem the new wideband 5G cells face where anything in line-of-sight blocks the signal, such as going indoors. For example, all the 5G speed test demos are carried out either outdoors or in a cellphone shop that has an indoor 5G node.
  10. 1 point
    CA3LE

    Date Format Problem in downloaded CSV file

    Thank you for clearing that up Sean, you rock. I'll add an option to change the date format sitewide.
  11. 1 point
    Sean

    Date Format Problem in downloaded CSV file

    From a quick check on my end, the issue is that Excel expects dates to be formatted as DD/MM/YYYY (how we write dates in Ireland), but the CSV file has them written as MM/DD/YYYY, the way the USA writes dates. When Excel reads in the CSV file, it read the lines like 06/01/2019 as the 6th January 2019, 8/02/2019 as the 8th February 2019 and so on until it reaches a 13 or higher digit in the middle, such as 05/13/2019. As there is no 13th month, it will treat this as a text field and in turn left-align them. This continues until it reaches a line that contains a digit of 12 or less in the middle of the date, which again it reads as a valid month. Microsoft recently changed the CSV importing process in Office 365 (which I use), so these steps below may not correspond with your Excel version. Go into the Data column (1), click 'Get Data' (2), 'From File' (3) and then 'From Text/CSV' (4): Choose the downloaded CSV file, then click 'Transform Data': Right-click the Column1 heading (1), then go into 'Change Type' (2) => 'Use Locale...' (3): Choose 'Date/Time' for the Date Type field (1), then 'English (United States)' for the Locale field (2), then click 'OK': Finally click the "Close & Load" icon (4 in above screenshot) and it should import and present them in your locale date format, e.g. dd/mm/yyyy for my region: 🙂
  12. 1 point
    Sean

    How does a WISP work?

    Here in Ireland WISPs advertise packages anywhere from 4Mbps up to 150Mbps. The price also varies a lot from one WISP to another and most have multiple price tiers according to the ordered speed. So it's hard to say what speed to expect, a bit like asking what kind of speeds do you get on a motorway. Which city? Rush hour? Tollway? etc... it's the same with a WISP. 🙂 As wireless is a shared medium, the actual real world speed varies according to the number of users online on the local mast. For example, with the WISP Imagine that advertises 150Mbps, I've seen people post speed tests anywhere from under 2Mbps to over 100Mbps in the evening, i.e. those lucky to get the high speeds likely have very few subscribers on the local mast, e.g. just recently installed. When an ISP goes live in your area, you'll likely get the best speeds from it in the first few months of it going live. The amount it drops off will depend on how many others in your area join the service. As for the text colour, click this icon in the toolbar and choose 'Automatic': 😉
  13. 1 point
    Me too. I just thought about it and came to check up. I don't always see notifications as I can get sucked into programming vortexes sometimes that prevent me from seeing anything other than what's right in front of my eyeballs. Being totally honest... Topics that I genuinely find interesting, I pop back in like this. Any notification I got on this topic (subscribed btw) got buried... sometimes I see them. Sometimes not. First, I have to reread this topic now, but keep in mind, people were pulling much faster speeds on TestMy.net way over 10 years ago. Right now... nearly anyone's phone > nearly any computer from 10 years ago. Processor speed can be a factor, especially in multithread, but it's not a real factor unless resources are being fully utilized elsewhere. Like, if another application is eating up all of your available resources.. then it may affect your results. Otherwise, very minimal CPU resources are actually needed to run TMN. Your computer may burst resources if available but they aren't necessary to make the test function properly. It might help with animations but the test itself functions the same regardless of the animations on your screen. This is made to run equally on all devices, the network resource is the limiting factor in the methodology behind TestMy.net. The same core behind what I originally built is still what drives this speed test. The basic principals are exactly the same, over the years it just renders quicker and gets to the final result more efficiently. My multithread speed test (other speed tests run this way by default) can often give people a more favorable result, especially with a fast CPU and fast computer in general situation.... but from our user feedback it's obvious those favorable results only hide issues. --- other speed tests use multithread by default. My own results... much better with multithread, used to be even. When my multithread and classic results match... that's always a perfectly running connection. And a clean computer on top of it. If you want me to bore you with the details, just ask me a question. To be honest... I've told the story too many times and nobody cares. --- 20 people might read this far, might.
  14. 1 point
    Pahoo Katawah

    My Average Tool

    Thanks but I haven’t uploaded anything yet, although I do have a wide variety of playlist content for both the discerning and the non-discerning viewers 🤯
  15. 1 point
    CA3LE

    My Average Tool

    The Hourly Average tool has been converted to also average Date/Day, Day of Week, Month and Year and has been renamed My Average. Averaging speed test results by hour, day, day of week, month and year can help you pinpoint slow times. Members with long TestMy.net history can aggregate all the way back to their original results. So you can see how your speed has improved (or not) over the years. myaverage?hostQ=&dateFull=&q=CA3LE&var=Year Hope you like it.
  16. 1 point
    I use AutoSpeedTest often, it's a great tool. When using AutoSpeedTest, there are times when my internet is not available (speed = ~0Mbs, ISP is down, etc). When I look at my Results, I do not see these '0 Mbs data points' in the list. This data would be very useful to me when talking to my ISP about my service. Is there any way for AutoSpeedTest to capture these times when my internet is 0? I presume that some TMN code would need to be running on my local machine to log this info... thanks again!
  17. 1 point
    A while back, I posted a command line batch file (in this post) that would log the time stamp each time the Internet went down and up, which you can use in the meantime. Since the TestMy beta, I see it monitors whether the connection is down or up. For example, when I turn on Aeroplane mode, the TestMy page displays a "Connection failed" pop-up at the bottom and once I take off Aeroplane mode, it shows "Online" briefly: In this case, it would just be a matter of this module recording the timestamp each time the connection goes down (such as in a Cookie). When the connection goes up, it just needs to send this timestamp along with the restored time to the server.
  18. 1 point
    rrr10

    My Average Tool

    Impressive! Thanks for the continuous improvement!
  19. 1 point
    Sean

    Eir 1Gb speed tests

    While visiting friends that run a hostel and talking about broadband, they mentioned about having to get their road and footpath dug up to get a fibre cable in the building. They mentioned they have Eir's Gigabit connection (1000Mbps down / 100Mbps up). The only thing I had with was my phone, a HTC U11, so I tried a few speed tests, connected on their Wi-Fi 5GHz band: From what I heard, Eir's F2000 router (Huawei HG659b) doesn't have great Wi-Fi performance, so I asked if I could borrow a laptop and a network cable to try some tests with. The laptop looked new and was reasonably spec'd (Core i5 8250u) with an SSD. Initially I ran into the 100Mbps issue until I looked closely at the cable and saw it was a Category 5 cable, so I asked if they have any other and got a chunkier Cat 6 cable and the full 1Gbps Ethernet connection. 😃 From a handful of tests, the following are the fastest single thread tests I got, both in the Chrome browser: Although the German server did better, it had a very slow ramp-up time, so this was after letting it go through progressive steps until it reached the 200MB block size. With the UK server, it ramped up faster but kept ramping up even when progressing through each test stage. In multi-thread mode with the UK server, most tests were around the 500's and the second one is the fastest I got at the time: Netflix's Fast.com doesn't seem to be able to handle a 1Gbps connection properly as it was constantly giving test results over 1Gbps, one as high as 1.6Gbps! These results were obviously impossible when the physical network interface is only 1Gbps. Ookla's speed test varied between 500 and 940Mbps, but as I demonstrated earlier it discards dips during the connection. Anyway, as I was curious to see what the connection could sustain, I started by downloading a large Linux DVD ISO from Heanet (Ireland's National Research & Education Network). The Heanet mirror site has at least 4 x 10Gbps backbone peers. The following is with a single file transfer after waiting a minute for the network graph to fill: 37.8MB/s = 302.4Mbps. The Ethernet graph is raw data and includes about 10% overhead. The following is with 4 DVD ISOs simultaneously downloading from Heanet after allowing the network graph to fill: That appears to around 750-950Mbps of sustained raw throughput or around 800Mbps of usable data throughput. 😎 As this was at a hostel with several guests, it's quite likely they were using a small portion of the throughput, such as streaming in their rooms. On the other hand, it's quite impressive considering this hostel is in a coastal rural location surrounded by farmland and the sea.
  20. 1 point
    Sean

    Android data throughput graph experiment

    As my Internet connection throughput intermittently dips due to running on a cellular 4G network, I was curious to see how well the Internet Speed Meter app handles fluctuating traffic. From running linear and multithreaded tests with TestMy, it corresponds reasonably well with TestMy on download tests. Things got a little interesting when I ran Ookla's Speed test where my connection throughput fluctuated during the test. Here are the two full-screen screenshots. In the above graphs, I drew in horizontal lines for each 0.5MB/s. In the graphs below, I drew the green line based on the download test result divided by 8 for MB/s, calculated to the nearest pixel: _ The reason I picked these two graphs is that the traffic graphs were very similar, apart from a deeper dip during Ookla's speed test. That didn't stop it producing a faster result! These graphs clearly show the two different methodologies these speed tests take. To my eyes with the left graph, the area of the spikes above the green line will roughly fill the valleys below it. So I have no doubt I was averaging about 22Mbps at the time. As for the right graph, there's no way I was averaging 23Mbps during that test. This is a clear example of Speedtest's methodology "The fastest 10% and slowest 30% of your results are DISCARDED". During this test, I saw the speedometer hit 26Mbps briefly before dipping to the low teens for a few seconds, then gradually climbed until it hit the 23 figure just be fore the download stage ended.
  21. 1 point
    ShakTib

    Lisa

    Hello Lisa, Your information seem partial, so lets try to figure out few things. Games on your phone: Do you have iPhone or Android device? Are you connected to Data (3G/4G/LTE) or Wifi? If you are at home and connected to wifi, is your wifi actually connected with "No internet"? you might have a routing issue. If other devices work fine in your home network but not your phone, try "forgetting network" on your phone and reconnecting and re-entering the password. Hope this starts you in the right direction. Cheers! Also. Welcome to TMN!
  22. 1 point
    ShakTib

    My Average Tool

    Oh this is nice.
  23. 1 point
    Hey @DESAND, I may be wrong (I like to believe I am not lol), but I don't think you RAM is the main issue... C55D I believe (which quick research) is an AMD E1 CPU which is only 1GHZ & dual-core. You are bottle necking the brain power of that laptop. Browser now use more processing power. Not just Firefox (Chrome is worse). I recommend looking into a invest of a processor that is 2GHZ or quad-core. Upgrading your ram gives the PC more "hands" to hold things, metaphorically, to hold more applications running at the same time. CPU is more about actually processing things, or "thinking" and "doing", what you have told it to do by clicking and typing, (essentially almost everything on the browser), especially videos playbacks. I have a feeling you need a better processor, which in turn is a newer laptop, since you can't upgrade a processor on a laptop. (For the sake on sanity and reasonable investments, don't try either lol). @CA3LE why you gotta make this a whole Edison / Tesla war man... But when i said Edison killed Tesla, I meant literally, killed him... I don't remember, but I think it was a hired hit... I don't have my facts straight.... hmmm
  24. 1 point
    That “...strange...weird...” bug thing you captured on video. I had the identical thing last summer! Never saw anything like it so I tried to get a couple of pictures. It was through a window cause I got a thing about insects. They weren’t so good but if you don’t mind, I know a specialist who helped me identify something I was going to kill to be a predator of ground nesting hornets 🐝 (it actually goes into the nest and eats them, I don’t know how it survives) and I would like to point her to your excellent video. I haven’t seen one yet this year. I apologize for going off track on this website and it won’t happen again. On another note I’m testing a variety of different devices with built in web access, like a couple of very different TVs, doorbell/camera and remote chimes, vacuum cleaner, blu-ray players and iPads. I also just learned that the ISP is using 11.n and doesn’t support 11.ac. So now I have their modem going to their free router that is locked tighter than Fort Knox and my router (D-Link 895) connected to one of the Gb ports on their router. So I now have a total of 5 SSIDs (or 6) spread across the 2.5 and 5.0 bands. I’m thinking of reversing the the two routers. Congrats on this website! I’m going to be a very busy guy here❗️ 😉
  25. 1 point
    Hi Folks, I am a big fan of your service. I have to use it regularly due to a very tricky set of internet connections to maintain. While the old version of the interface was admittedly a little plain, the new version with a giant flashing graphic is a no-go for me. I need to run it while I am working on other things, and all that flashing is just a big distraction, and I won't use it. Thank you kindly for keeping the link to use the old version. I would suggest toning down in your next redesign. The bigger and flashier, the "cheaper" your service looks. Maybe I'm not your target audience. But I don't know many professionals who want a big cartoon flashing status bar, and flashing text when a simple progress bar will convey the information without creating distractions. If I didn't think this mattered to the viability of your business, and I didn't value your service, I wouldn't bother to write, So please understand this as meant with respect. Keith
  26. 1 point
    Having been a Windows user for 30+ years those things were 2nd nature to me but now, having an iPad, I’m out to lunch with it❗️😲 How did you do it on your iPhone? And thanks for the laugh at the end❗️
  27. 1 point
    What!?! I had no idea you were on YouTube. Excellent video! OK, you've made me speechless! THANK YOU!!! And I finally AM seeing a difference in my speed & bandwidth. This is from last night:
  28. 1 point
    CA3LE I'm glad I posted this thread now. I sort of forgot that the whole purpose of the forums is to educate people about the services they are paying for. I run across people all the time who don't even know they can check their data speeds and most of those that do are only aware of Ookla's test via Speedtest.net of their ISP. You guys are great thanks
  29. 1 point
    Edison won many battles against Tesla but Tesla and Westinghouse won the AC/DC war. Came down to distribution. AC can travel much further distance. Tesla wasn't really understood during his own time. Can't really blame people for thinking he was out of his mind. He did after all have a pigeon as a girlfriend. Edison was an invention thief... he found geniuses like Tesla, patented their inventions and called them his own. "Hey, you were getting a paycheck from me while you came up with that invention... patent filed -- now it's MINE!" --- he ripped off and ruined lot of real inventors --- Tesla > Edison. He was so advanced that it's taken over 100 years for us to finally appreciate some of his inventions. It may take us even longer to understand some of his other ideas. ... I can see DC playing a larger role in the future. Tesla vs Edison: the AC/DC current wars make a comeback -- We waste a lot of energy (in the form of heat) converting AC to DC right now (think about all of your power bricks), a DC powered home would be more efficient -- but it was AC that made it available for the masses in the first place.
  30. 1 point
    reading that over again, reminds me of Tesla vs. Edison ... Edison wanted DC which would have put power plants on every corner. Tesla was all about AC... we all know what happened there. Edison killed a bunch of elephants using AC power and still lost because nobody wants power stations on every corner. Just like nobody wants wifi units on every corner. ...just like AC vs DC... I don't think we need them on every corner. Wasted resources, as humans, we can do it smarter.
  31. 1 point
    @DESAND, Oh you're kindly welcome. Since you are getting 92-96mbps. The 100mbps makes more sense to be honest. On a random note: Is this a laptop or a desktop PC? Network cards are pretty cheap (relatively under $40 for gigabit usually labelled "10/100/1000" or something if I remember correctly). You will never need 10 gigabit network card for any consumer use, not until 10 years from now, maybe. Don't get upsold lol Good luck!
  32. 1 point
    Thanks ShakTib It's exactly what was looking for. It shows am capable of 100.0 Mbps of data transfer. I might as well cancel the 250 Mbps plan until I have equipment that can utilize it. You're awesome. :)
  33. 1 point
    The location information is for general reference, you won't be detected perfectly 100% of the time. IP location data I use is about 86% accurate at detecting cities in the US within a 30 mile radius. As you're scrolling through your results you'll see icons next to the date indicating any identifiers logged with the result. You can then select identifiers from the drop down on the right, above the result details. Here's a video, let me know if this helps.
  34. 1 point
    CA3LE

    What am I testing?

    Remember, they are your Internet Service Provider... not local area network provider. Measuring your speed to their servers doesn't tell you much about how they're delivering your Internet. TestMy.net is the only test results you need to present them with. Also, because you're a member TMN has been tracking your response time (ping) in the background. Pahoo Katawah Response Time That looks really good actually. Ping isn't always an indicator. TestMy.net is testing between the client and server. The client being your machine. The route the connection must take to do that has it running right through your providers connections. Not just testing between the server and your ISP. Between you and the server and everything between.
  35. 1 point
    For over a year I've been complaining to my ISP that I thought there was a problem with the modem I rent from them. I am paying for a service of 100Mbps. They guarantee 80% of that. The best results I ever got from TMN was 56Mbps via network cable, avg 38 via wifi output. On at least a weekly basis I would have to call them and reset the modem. On a couple occasions they sent out a service tech. The first time the tech added a coax coupler and ran a test (Speedtest.net) and showed me I was getting 87Mbps. I told the tech that wasn't an accurate test. A few months later they sent out a tech again to check the equipment. He ran a speedtest (Ookla) on his phone using my wifi. After several attempts he finally got a speed of 76Mbps. I ran a test on my Laptop using TMN and got a result of 48Mbps. I was told to run Speedtest because it tested from their own server. Ran the test using Speedtest and got a result of 78 and was told TMN was not reliable. Fast forward: This past 2 weeks I've had to call daily and get them to reset the signal. Finally Thur 5/09 they agreed to send out a tech on Tues to check and possibly swap out the Hitron modem. Friday when the service stopped again I asked if I could drive the forty miles to the store. Saturday I did so and here are the results. TMN 92.8 dnld 7.87 up with peak down at 94.8. surprisingly at test at Speedtest.net give a download speed of 94.87 Mbps. Sunday I actually had a TMN download speed of 99.6. Thanks to TMN my ISP has given me a $60 credit for this month and a $30 reduction for the next 12 months. Thank you, Denny
  36. 1 point
    CA3LE

    Hourly speed averages graph question

    By default it's showing you everything logged under your username, aggregated into hourly averages. If you select 'Date Range' you can query specific days or a range of days. Let me know if this helps.
  37. 1 point
    Was re-reading this... Don't you love how they fish for the result that plays into their narrative. It's not the tech's fault, they're just doing what they're trained to do. Use the company's speed test ...and others that play into the same narrative. It didn't used to be this way. 😞
  38. 1 point
    Logan paul

    What am I testing?

    Thanks, bro letting us now this. I was about to ask the same question you explain.
  39. 1 point
    CA3LE

    New Version Feedback

    Fixed! Thanks for catching that... very odd error actually. It was a quick and easy find and fix though. Just not completely sure why that happened in that specific instance. It's like, even though I found the 15 characters of code that caused it... it's unclear to me why that would have been an issue. But that's programming for you. I agree. I don't think the majority of people out there will prefer dark mode all the time... but I like that there's an option now.
  40. 1 point
    Pgoodwin1

    New Version Feedback

    @CA3LE I like having the dark mode option. Thanks. I noticed that on the Results page, the Light/Dark selector link at the bottom of the page isn’t there. It’s there on the Download and Upload pages. The date range selector on the Results is pretty cool too. The downside is when you want to display say 6 months of results, you have to scroll the calendar when you used to be able to just enter a number of days. Not sure if you can come up with an easy way to allow the user to just enter the number of days.
  41. 1 point
    Sean

    New Version Feedback

    With me, it's similar with running speed tests at night, such as while travelling with someone in a car or on a bus. Even with my phone screen dimmed to minimum, a white page background still gives off plenty of light. This is especailly noticeable when I switch back and forth between the signal meter app (Network Cell Info) which has a black theme and then back to TestMy on the web browser. This is where I like the dark theme. On my PC, I'm happy with the regular white theme particularly during the day time. So with me, it's difficult to say which theme I prefer most as it depends on the situation, a bit like giving my preference on whether I prefer the room light on or off. ? Edit: One issue I've run into with the dark mode is the Express Test does not show the progress meter and the percentage stays at '0%' until the test completes: It does this in both Firefox, Chrome and on my mobile Firefox browser also. The does complete successfully despite showing no progress. The regular and fixed block size tests show the progress fine in the dark mode.
  42. 1 point
    That's funny, I just happened to be looking at your account as you registered. -- you'd think it was the php logo that caught my attention but I actually only saw your username first. I really appreciate that you want to donate. Over 10 years ago there was a link for donation, maybe I'll bring it back. If you really want to help testmy.net... talk about it. Your word-of-mouth drives my engine. Spreading the word is most valuable. If testmy.net helps you all I ask is that you talk about it, write about it, link to it or just continue to use it. You wanting to donate already means a lot to me. Thank you! Hope to see you around here for a long time!
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