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Adobe refuses to let flash die

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[...]

The NPAPI version of Adobe Flash Player is the version that runs natively on the system. It installs on your operating systems and all the applications can access it. It means all the browsers running on your system will display Flash content on the web using the NPAPI.

Adobe, in 2012 had discontinued the NPAPI version of Flash player for Linux and promised only security updates till 2017. But recently, Adobe announced that it will completely support NPAPI for Linux. More on that later.

[...]

The PPAPI version of Adobe Flash Player is the product of a collaboration between Google’s Chrome and Adobe. NPAPI is native, had a great performance, but the whole concept of NPAPI had become irrelevant and there was a need for something different. Something advanced.

Google was looking to re-define some basic parameters regarding how the Web worked. Web apps or web based applications that could work on computers, without the bias of platform were the ultimate ambition of Google in this division. (I must say It’s doing pretty good.)

[...]

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This is a subjective injection of truly obscene abuse of reality in my opinion, is using part of what made your past great, in the attempt to perpetuate your existence in the sector by mixing some obscure cocktail in hopes if inoculating your own demise.

 

To put this another way, much like getting all sweaty with the team, pounding away at the keyboard working to get that 'fix' for a system wide exploit,  there after rolling in dry sand to claim it can be done painlessly, all the while rubbing ointment on the nether regions and itchy sand fleas wondering why you have rash ass. 

 

This move inspires thoughts of a deranged scientist in a fully funded (via other projects) in some concrete/ steel fluorescent lit lab 27 stories underground in an old WW2 base (much like the long haired dude from the movie Independence Day; "they don't let us out of here very often, as you can imagine") trying to reanimate the dead, just because he has the resources to attempt it. Pure mental masturbation.

 

Have we not proven alternative means which would otherwise show themselves as a much 'better', or appropriate I should say means for video, advertising, and malware. Let it go Adobe, just let it rest in pieces. Is there not another venue to exploit and name proprietary?

 

Appearances are everything? Then this attempt of re-animation give the appearance more of an attempt to perpetuate the botnet industry than actually assisting with the forward momentum of media access for the masses.

 

 

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Like most things obsolete, Global Warming, Tenured Professors, NWS, etc., it is called publish or perish.

 

Adobe, a long time ago, served the greater common good, now they can't program their way out of a wet paper bag.

Witness the constant updates to their software that works most of the time or the switch from selling software to renting software.

The almighty $ rules.

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5 hours ago, fey42 said:

Like most things obsolete, Global Warming, Tenured Professors, NWS, etc., it is called publish or perish.

 

Adobe, a long time ago, served the greater common good, now they can't program their way out of a wet paper bag.

Witness the constant updates to their software that works most of the time or the switch from selling software to renting software.

The almighty $ rules.

I can agree completely, while adding the opinion, if they as in Adobe, would have been open source/ non proprietary, contributors would have certainly embraced the fleeting resource. However since not so much, reality took over long ago, for instance HTML5

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Besides all the security updates and holes, the most annoying thing I find with Flash is that it is continuing to get more resource intensive and is causing havoc with streaming services on low end hardware.

 

Earlier this year, I bought a Lenovo TV stick (Atom Z3735F), which is a PC (running Windows 10) in stick that plugs directly into the TV's HDMI port.  Plug in a wireless keyboard and mouse, the TV effectively becomes the monitor similar to a home theatre PC.  It has no problem playing 1080p from any video files I tried and similarly has no problem streaming 1080p on YouTube and most other HTML5 based streaming services.

 

However, when it comes to Flash based streaming websites, it is hit & miss as to whether it streams in standard definition and very few streaming services work in 720p, let alone 1080p with Flash, despite no problems whatsoever with HTML5 streaming.  Even on the few Flash websites that stream fine in standard definition, the ad-breaks is the killer as there is no way to skip the ads that insist in playing in what appears to be 1080p frame by frame with the audio blipping as it struggles with each second of the ad.

 

I can now see why people prefer to use Android based set-top boxes (which use Apps instead of flash for streaming) or home theatre PCs with higher end CPUs just to cater for those websites that insist on using their CPU-hogging Flash player.

Edited by Sean

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