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Sean

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  1. Like
    Sean got a reaction from mudmanc4 in Wireless interference   
    Indeed they should definitely offer a lot mor ethan 30Mbps.  I used to peak around 60Mbps with my former Huawei router with only 300Mbps over 802.11n (2.4GHz).
     
    With my current set-up, a Huawei B525 with 802.11ac, I get around 110Mbps between it and my desktop PC (TP-Link Archer AC1900 USB) based on a load test between the PC and a laptop connected to the router.  This is with the Huawei B525 in the loft at one end of the house attached to a pair of LTE antennas and my desktop PC on the ground floor at the opposite end.
     
    Based on my experience troubleshooting Wi-Fi performance in the past, nearby power supplies can severely deteoriate the Wi-Fi performance.  For example, I remember my brother struggling to get over 3Mbps over Wi-Fi, only to discover his router was on a shelf with its power supply socket directly underneath the shelf.  Due to the shelf location, he couldn't move the router and there was just the one power socket nearby, directly underneath the shelf.  As an experiment, he placed a sheet of aluminium foil underneath the router.  His Internet speed tests over Wi-Fi jumped straight to about 76Mbps, the same as with a network cable.
  2. Like
    Sean got a reaction from mudmanc4 in Wireless interference   
    Indeed they should definitely offer a lot mor ethan 30Mbps.  I used to peak around 60Mbps with my former Huawei router with only 300Mbps over 802.11n (2.4GHz).
     
    With my current set-up, a Huawei B525 with 802.11ac, I get around 110Mbps between it and my desktop PC (TP-Link Archer AC1900 USB) based on a load test between the PC and a laptop connected to the router.  This is with the Huawei B525 in the loft at one end of the house attached to a pair of LTE antennas and my desktop PC on the ground floor at the opposite end.
     
    Based on my experience troubleshooting Wi-Fi performance in the past, nearby power supplies can severely deteoriate the Wi-Fi performance.  For example, I remember my brother struggling to get over 3Mbps over Wi-Fi, only to discover his router was on a shelf with its power supply socket directly underneath the shelf.  Due to the shelf location, he couldn't move the router and there was just the one power socket nearby, directly underneath the shelf.  As an experiment, he placed a sheet of aluminium foil underneath the router.  His Internet speed tests over Wi-Fi jumped straight to about 76Mbps, the same as with a network cable.
  3. Like
    Sean got a reaction from iceb in Host Graph   
    To me, that seems like either high packet loss or intermittent drop-outs, both which you can check by running an extended ping test while streaming.
     
    On a Windows PC, open a command prompt (Start -> Windows System -> Command Prompt) and type the following command:
    ping -t 8.8.8.8  
    You should see a continuous run of "Reply from 8.8.8.8".  Leave that window open and start streaming a programme. 
     
    As soon as the streaming stalls, check the window for any "Request timed out" lines.  If you see three or more in a row, your connection had a brief outage.
     
    Press CTRL + C on the keyboard to stop the ping utility.  Look at '% loss' figure.  If that is 1% or higher, scroll up by holding the mouse down on the top-right up-arrow and look out for lines that say 'Request timed out'.  If you see three or more grouped together, that is another brief outage.  If you come across five or more 'Request timed out' lines in one screen-full, this is a high packet loss issue, which can also interrupt streaming. 
     
    I've had an issue in the past with at least 3 D-Link routers failing with a high packet loss with this exact symptom, i.e. no issue with browsing or speed tests, but could not reliably stream YouTube.
  4. Like
    Sean reacted to JGF in Rural Satellite Internet Help   
    Appreciate the assistance.  I tested using my cellular phone as a mobile hot spot with USB tethering.  It worked well so I bought a hot spot and will be attempting to use that now.  Thank you for responding.
  5. Thanks
    Sean reacted to CA3LE in Cannot exit Multithread mode while logged out   
    I was finally able to get it to bug like that.
     
    Should be all fixed for you know.   Thank you Sean!
  6. Thanks
    Sean got a reaction from CA3LE in Cannot exit Multithread mode while logged out   
    If I am not logged on to TestMy, and switch to Mulltithread mode, the [Linear] button at the top right does not work.  Neither does the 'Disable Multithreading' button.
     
    Steps to reproduce:
    Log out of TestMy (or open an incognito/private browser). Click Multithread at the top-right. Click the 'Enable Multithreading' button. Click [Linear] at the top-right. Click the 'Disable Multithreading' button.  
    It will continue to display "MultiI Select" at the top-right, sometimes even with the British flag:
     

     
    I'm not sure if it's related, but if I perform the above steps and then go to the Download page and click the 'Express Test!' button, it display a "Not Found" error page:
     

     
    I checked this with Chrome, Edge and Firefox.
  7. Thanks
    Sean got a reaction from CA3LE in Cannot exit Multithread mode while logged out   
    This is a screen-recording from my end with Chrome, Firefox and Edge.  I uploaded it as an unlisted video on YouTube to embed here:
     
     
  8. Like
    Sean reacted to Moonwolf222 in Proof of Network Throttling   
    So, after thinking about my slow download speed that only occurred during specific times, I got to thinking. What was the common denominator? Street lights! I contacted my electric company and asked if they could disable the closet street lights to my location. Friday night, I checked my speed, but it still dropped shortly after 7pm. The next week, I had both the phone linesman and one of the electric company linesman come to my house just after my speed dropping again. The had me hook up my modem directly to a generator, and run my laptop by battery. Still no change. Then the electric company guy cut power to the area where I live. Still no change. Before they left, they discussed the option of a planned blackout further away from my house sometime that week, after getting permission from the town. Soon after they departed, I went and checked my download speed again. Lo and behold, it was back! The phone man called from his office shortly after, and I asked if he was seeing what I was. He stated that after leaving, he and the electric company guy got to a street light that wasn't operating except for a very faint glow. It was unhooked from the town power, and I got my internet back! So, if any of you have an issue like this, tell your phone company/electric company to start disconnecting street lights!
  9. Like
    Sean reacted to CA3LE in Kilobytes and Kilobits Abbreviation Conventions   
    Hi swantesty,
     

     
    I'm using the correct conversions, please see https://testmy.net/understand-bandwidth.
     
    In your details you can see next to the result in Mbps is also the result in MB/s.
     

     
    You may not be getting the same results as other tests because TestMy.net is not the other speed tests.  Other speed tests draw resources in multiple streams.  Although TestMy.net can test that way (enable the multithread speed test and test again as you normally do, keep in mind it remembers the setting next time) it does not work this way by default.  As a community we found right away that the multithread testing method that everyone uses often masks issues.  You can achieve higher results in multithread even if you have an issue affecting your bandwidth.  You should instead be tuning single thread performance, if that performs at it's full potential the multithread results will always fall in line.
     
    Multithread speed test results favor the ISP.  They'd rather you had 10 pipes at 10 Mbps than to draw that all down one pipe.  In that example you will appear to have 100 Mbps when you aggregate the result into one but in TMN's eyes... you have 10 Mbps.  TMN isn't here to make it easy, it's here to help you improve.  It will only call it how it sees it.
     
    I've seen it on my own connection and my own mother has seen it on hers.  Both times (separate instances) we knew we had an issue at the time so we went out and used a bunch of other speed tests to compare what members had been telling us for years.  speedtest.net and others reported 10X higher result when we had modem issues that were physically limiting the single thread performance.  If we had only used the other tests we could have thought, "well it must just be the websites I'm visiting."   --- The only test that gave indication to the issue was TestMy.net.  Modems were swapped and both times and instantly performance returned on TMN results.  Re-testing other speed tests had pretty much the same results as before so again, no indication.  We had many other factors that were tested outside of speed tests to prove the performance was in line with what TMN was reporting.  That was probably over 7 years ago, the same is true now.  The methodology here is the same as it has been since TMN's inception in 2001.
  10. Like
    Sean got a reaction from CA3LE in TCP Optimizer (program) results in no improvement   
    Going by that Downstream rate, your modem appears to be facing a lot of noise or attenuation on the line.
     
    Check the downstream attenuation and noise margin (or S/N) figrues. 
     
    If the S/N value is higher than 6dB, try rebooting the modem and see if the Downstream figure increases.  If the S/N figure remains quite high such as over 12dB, then the Internet service provider is likely restricting your maximum speed.  For example, on my DSL line, the maximum I can get is 5120Kbps as that is what the ISP deems is the maximum my line can support.
     
    If the downstream attenuation figure is very high such as over 50dB (and you're not 2+ miles from the exchange), try another phone lead between your modem and the socket and check if the figure improves after the DSL syncs again.  If the figure does not improve, then there is likely some other fault with the line such as degradation, water ingress, corroded contacts (including at the exchange end), etc.  If you have a DSL filter/splitter, try removing it.
  11. Like
    Sean reacted to mudmanc4 in testmy.net perfection   
    Let this sink in for a moment.
     

     
    Now have a look at setting in squid locally:
     

  12. Like
    Sean got a reaction from AlmightyBeanz93 in Net Neutrality and throttling of testmy.net by ISP   
    If ISPs decide to throttle traffic, they would need to do this all services to be effective, in which case it would probably be easier for them to charge by maximum speed like many ISPs did in the post, e.g. one price for 10Mbps, a higher price for 50Mbps and so on.  Otherwise, it would be relatively straight forward to overcome with the use of a VPN.  Let's say an ISP prioritises port 8080 to deliver fast speed tests while throttling everything else, just use something like OpenVPN over port 8080 with a VPN privacy service.  To the ISP, all your traffic would be seen and treated as speed test traffic.
     
    For example, about two years ago the Irish cellular networks Three and Vodafone were doing something similar, i.e. throttling most traffic over the standard web ports (e.g. HTTP port 80), while letting port 8080 run at full speed to deliver fast speed tests, at least with the well-known Ookla Speedtest App.  At the time, it meant one could get 4G speed tests over 20Mbps, yet faced slow browsing speeds similar to a 1Mbps connection.  All I had to do was make a VPN connection over port 8080 (same port # as Ookla uses for its speed tests) and everything performed a heck of a lot better.  A few months later, Three changed their tactic by prioritising certain services such as YouTube when the network is congested.  This means YouTube can potentially play 4K fine even when the speed tests (including Ookla) deliver low test result figures. 
  13. Thanks
    Sean reacted to CA3LE in Add Cloudflare as a Multithread test server   
    I'm not really sure why it was disabled, it used to be an option.     I think there was an issue with it at some point, it was disabled and just never re-enabled.
     
    You can select cloud.testmy.net from the multithread selection now.
     

     
    Let me know how it works for you.  Thanks for pointing that out too.
  14. Thanks
    Sean reacted to CA3LE in Multithread mode test [STOP] and Express upload buttons are broken   
    Thank you Sean, all of those issues should be resolved now. 
  15. Thanks
    Sean got a reaction from CA3LE in Multithread mode test [STOP] and Express upload buttons are broken   
    When a multithread test is in progress, the [STOP] button does not work properly, bringing up a 'Secure Connection Failed' error screen.  When I hover my mouse over the [STOP] button...

    ... the address shown in the status bar has a ':80' after the domain name:

     
    It affects the mobile website also, again bringing up an error screen when I touch [STOP], with the ':80' clearly in the URL it tried loading:

     
    This issue also affects the upload test on the mobile website when Multithread mode is enabled (left image).  The Express upload test also fails with Multithread mode enabled (right image):

  16. Like
    Sean reacted to CA3LE in Isn't HOSTSTATS likely to be badly skewed, by definition?   
    The same logic where more people are likely to post negative reviews than positive ones.  You're probably right, to a degree.  I think there are also plenty of people who test here on sunny days.  If that is true, it's true across the board with all providers.  They're all being judged using the same method.  In my experience, the better providers always perform better and rank higher here.  Is any of this perfect, no.  Will it ever be perfect, no.  Will I try, definitely.
     
    After TMN's recent full switch to https (SSL) settles in with the search engines I have an upgrade to the host stats pages you mention.  It aggregates a much broader range and I think it better represents the highlighted ISP, city or country's speed because it won't just be showing you the logs like it does today.  It will unlock a huge amount of information that TMN has been calculating and storing in private databases for a very long time now.    So look for that tool to become higher resolution in the near future.
  17. Like
    Sean got a reaction from AlmightyBeanz93 in Net Neutrality and throttling of testmy.net by ISP   
    If ISPs decide to throttle traffic, they would need to do this all services to be effective, in which case it would probably be easier for them to charge by maximum speed like many ISPs did in the post, e.g. one price for 10Mbps, a higher price for 50Mbps and so on.  Otherwise, it would be relatively straight forward to overcome with the use of a VPN.  Let's say an ISP prioritises port 8080 to deliver fast speed tests while throttling everything else, just use something like OpenVPN over port 8080 with a VPN privacy service.  To the ISP, all your traffic would be seen and treated as speed test traffic.
     
    For example, about two years ago the Irish cellular networks Three and Vodafone were doing something similar, i.e. throttling most traffic over the standard web ports (e.g. HTTP port 80), while letting port 8080 run at full speed to deliver fast speed tests, at least with the well-known Ookla Speedtest App.  At the time, it meant one could get 4G speed tests over 20Mbps, yet faced slow browsing speeds similar to a 1Mbps connection.  All I had to do was make a VPN connection over port 8080 (same port # as Ookla uses for its speed tests) and everything performed a heck of a lot better.  A few months later, Three changed their tactic by prioritising certain services such as YouTube when the network is congested.  This means YouTube can potentially play 4K fine even when the speed tests (including Ookla) deliver low test result figures. 
  18. Like
    Sean got a reaction from mudmanc4 in cleaning a pc with air compressor   
    As ridiculous as it sounds, most computer components such as the motherboard, PSU and certain expansion cards can survive a full dishwasher cycle.  Obviously that's not how I recommend cleaning a PC.
     
    The following 8-year old video is an example.  The internals were covered in cigarette smoke residue, so he decided to dismantle the components and put them through the dish washer, with the exception of the case, battery and the hard disk. 
     
     
    I also enjoy watching videos on old hardware such as restoration videos.  I have come ones where such hobbyists put components through a dishwasher cycle to clean extensive debris build-up from being left for 10+ years in storage such as a dusty shed.
     
    As long as no moisture remains when the PC is powered up, it should be fine.  I generally clean my PC with an air duster, which is basically an aerosol can filled with propellant gas.  Here in Ireland, humidity is usually on the high side, e.g. I run a dehumidifier to keep the indoor level below 60%.
     
    The only component I may wash is the keyboard.  I have a Corsair Cherry Red Mechanical keyboard that I accidentally knocked a glass of cider on.  I immediately unplugged it, tried wiping off what I could and let it dry.  Once dry, many of the letters were sticking.  When I started removing the keys to try cleaning below, I realised the mechanical switches were jamming.
     
    With what appeared to be a ruined keyboard that I only purchased a few months before the incident, I figured I'll try giving it a bath as we don't have a dishwasher.  I partially filled a wide container with water from our dehumidifier (since it's effectively distilled), soaked the keyboard and pushed each key multiples times to force water through the switches.  I left it to dry for about a week.  It's fully functional again, all keys work and no sticking or other issue since. 
  19. Thanks
    Sean reacted to CA3LE in Here we go again. No detected provider.   
    I'll implement IPv6 GeoIP, it's in beta now.  Thank you Sean!
     
    Sorry for taking so long to respond, we just had a baby. 
  20. Thanks
    Sean got a reaction from CA3LE in Here we go again. No detected provider.   
    I have now tested this on an Eir 150Mbps FTTH connection which provides full IPv6 routing and get it looks like this issue is indeed IPv6 related:
     

  21. Thanks
    Sean got a reaction from CA3LE in Here we go again. No detected provider.   
    I am now able to replicate the issue at my end:
     

     
    The first two tests were over IPv6 (using the HE Tunnel Broker) and the second two tests were with IPv6 connectivity disabled.
     
    I'm not sure if the TestMy tests fully implement IPv6 support, however, the website itself has IPv6 connectivity.  The second ping below is when I re-enabled IPv6 on my network adapter:
     

     
    I'm not sure if the Hughes Network provides IPv6 connectivity, but if they now do, this may explain the provider identification issue.
  22. Thanks
    Sean reacted to CA3LE in Why is TestMy.net not showing up in Google?   
    Originally when I turned https on it was because you wanted to test on SSL and port 8080... I didn't necessarily want the search engines spidering what we hadn't even tested.  I think Google is going to weigh https sites heavier in the future so I'm moving the site over to https.  They already are but I expect it's going to be even more so.  I didn't realize the noindex was still in there... it's now controlled correctly with a separate robots.txt using mod_rewrite to switch the file.
     
    RewriteCond %{SERVER_PORT} ^443$ RewriteRule ^robots\.txt$ robots_ssl.txt [L]  
    ...but I've already disabled that in preparation.
     
    I'll make sure to include a toggle in the new settings with the option to switch between http and https.  But the site itself will completely run on SSL, regardless of the option selected.  And visiting https://testmy.net will no longer trigger that option.  It's really already done, I just want to make sure before I flip it over that I'm not missing anything that will affect pagerank negatively.
     
    I don't think the noindex on the https version was causing the issue though.  TestMy.net is showing up on Google again, before I removed that line.  Could have been one or a combination of the issues we previously talked about.  I'll keep working to find my mistakes. :-/ -- one constant is human error.
  23. Thanks
    Sean got a reaction from CA3LE in Why is TestMy.net not showing up in Google?   
    One possibility is that Google sees too many versions of the index, e.g. uk.testmy.net, dallas.testmy.net, etc.  and only lists a few variants.  I remember this being a pain in the past in the Joomla 1.x days where it would show the same page under various URLs and Google usually ended indexing obscure URL variations of some pages.
     
    Both Bing and DuckDuckGo have the main test.my homepage URL indexed, so it doesn't seem to be something preventing crawlers from indexing it. 
     
    One thing I suggest is adding a Canonical meta header tag to the home page to specify "https://testmy.net" as the preferred URL, as explained here.
  24. Thanks
    Sean got a reaction from CA3LE in Make speed test results available as data downloads   
    On the Results page, there's an 'Export' button just below the graph.  This will export your results history as a CSV file:
     

     
    The resulting CSV can open up as a spreadsheet such as with Excel:
     

  25. Like
    Sean got a reaction from mudmanc4 in cleaning a pc with air compressor   
    As ridiculous as it sounds, most computer components such as the motherboard, PSU and certain expansion cards can survive a full dishwasher cycle.  Obviously that's not how I recommend cleaning a PC.
     
    The following 8-year old video is an example.  The internals were covered in cigarette smoke residue, so he decided to dismantle the components and put them through the dish washer, with the exception of the case, battery and the hard disk. 
     
     
    I also enjoy watching videos on old hardware such as restoration videos.  I have come ones where such hobbyists put components through a dishwasher cycle to clean extensive debris build-up from being left for 10+ years in storage such as a dusty shed.
     
    As long as no moisture remains when the PC is powered up, it should be fine.  I generally clean my PC with an air duster, which is basically an aerosol can filled with propellant gas.  Here in Ireland, humidity is usually on the high side, e.g. I run a dehumidifier to keep the indoor level below 60%.
     
    The only component I may wash is the keyboard.  I have a Corsair Cherry Red Mechanical keyboard that I accidentally knocked a glass of cider on.  I immediately unplugged it, tried wiping off what I could and let it dry.  Once dry, many of the letters were sticking.  When I started removing the keys to try cleaning below, I realised the mechanical switches were jamming.
     
    With what appeared to be a ruined keyboard that I only purchased a few months before the incident, I figured I'll try giving it a bath as we don't have a dishwasher.  I partially filled a wide container with water from our dehumidifier (since it's effectively distilled), soaked the keyboard and pushed each key multiples times to force water through the switches.  I left it to dry for about a week.  It's fully functional again, all keys work and no sticking or other issue since. 
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