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Big Mountain

Compressed Air???

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I was cleaning my computer with compressed air and it tilted down and the watery cold kind hit my finger, I also have a cut on this finger, is this okay? Has anyone ever had this happen?

Hi Big Mountain , wellcome to the forum , you sure made a novel entrance ,

hope all is well ?

It is very dificult to injure yourself with compressed air from a can , but it is a good warning to us all,

Air can be injected directly into the veins either accidentally or as a deliberate act. Examples include misuse of a syringe, and industrial injury resulting from use of compressed air.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_embolism,

with a small cut that presumably wasn't bleeding I don't think you were in any great danger , just my view ,

Be Safe, Live long

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That liquid can give you frostbite(it is the propellant)....Notice how fast that liquid disapears..That is because the boiling point of that propellant is waaaay lower than the ambient temperature.  It does not evaporate, it boils.  This means if you get it on your hand/finger/etc, it will boil, while drawing large amounts of heat away from your skin(change of state uses a lot of energy).  Whatever the boiling point of that propellant is, will be the temperature on your finger until it boils away.

Refrigerants such as R22 boil at around -40 deg F(under normal atmospheric pressure).  So, if you get liquid R22 on your finger, it will be at

-40 deg F until it boils away.  I have a few fingers that have nice refrigerant burns on them..While the propellant used in air cans probably does not have such a low boiling point, it is low enough to cause skin damage.  Once your skin gets to 32 and below, you risk damage.

While the chance of accidentally getting frostbite with air cans is remote, it is possible if you are careless.

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But this is the reason why you never ever use caned air on any electronic device. That stuff is really bad. Always use air from a compressor.

And you do not have to run to the store to get another can, and is great for filling up pools, tires, blow up dolls, etc...  :evil6:

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You will be fine. As long as you don't like drink it, or get it in your eye.. lol

But this is the reason why you never ever use caned air on any electronic device. That stuff is really bad. Always use air from a compressor.

Yeah thats OK , but make sure the pressure is turned down , 50 Psi is enough to whip the board out of your hand , and BTW,  there is a water filter/trap in the line, otherwise the motherboard would be safer in the washing machine  :grin2:

and never use a nylon brush to remove the dust , 1 Motherboard later I realised my error  :cry2:

 

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Yeah thats OK , but make sure the pressure is turned down , 50 Psi is enough to whip the board out of your hand , and BTW,  there is a water filter/trap in the line, otherwise the motherboard would be safer in the washing machine  :grin2:

and never use a nylon brush to remove the dust , 1 Motherboard later I realised my error  :cry2:

   

You don't hold the fucking board in your hand while your blowing air on it.  :haha:  You leave it in the case, no need to take it out.

My compressor would rip it out of your hand, and put it through a window  :evil6:

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:2funny: Yeah, leave the components inside of the computer unless your really just bored. And turn the pressure down to about 15-20 lbs. That usually does it for me.

But not sure why now.  :whaa:

Lets you spray from any angle  --even upside down--  without frosting (expelling contents as a liquid).  Contains 8 oz. of pure tetrafluoroethane, which is 100% ozone safe, moisture-free, and non-flammable. Blasting power exceeds 80 psi. 
http://www.criticalcleaning.com/CCDusters.htm

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I gotta chime in here, I can't take it anymore  :? , some of you bring a compressor into your house, or drag a hose in there. I'm not doubting this , just a bit astonished that this is really happening somewhere.

I have used the "forbidden" cans for years. I just maintain a vertical position on the can, and bend the red extention to where I need it. I don't ever shake the can before , nor during use.

When I first use the can, each time, I aim the thing away from anything, and release that first bit of moisture that always seems to be there. The can will begin to freeze, and the pressure drops, so , I grab the next can while that one warms up.

I also use a toothbrush on boards that have been sitting for a while, or the ones that need it.

Never had any issues what so ever.

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well do tell, what did you guy's at the " place"  do,  ??????

Ok...per regulation....NEVER use more than 30 psi on any electronic device. Do so while being properly grounded to the equipment.

If a brush is nessary to remove particles....use a .....you guessed it...plain old paste brush like from kindergarden...has a metal tube handle and horse hair bristles...thus preventing ESD from building up while in use....or just laying around.

And.....the number one cleaning solvent to use...Denatured Alchol...might soften conformal coating on some boards...however I've never see any of that in a home computer.

There you have it...in a nut shell.

And remember....grounding is paramont...if you don't have an ESD strap....just lick both index fingers...and touch the case chassis FIRST.

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Thanks for clearing that up , but w/o me googling "it",  could you define "conformal coating" for me?

Conformal coating is a non-conductive clear coat that is applied to a circuit board that seals it from water or moisture.....the whole board will look like it's dipped in clear coat....usually used in outside applications that could become exposed to the elements....or in aircraft and marine use.... [nerdly]

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Conformal coating is a non-conductive clear coat that is applied to a circuit board that seals it from water or moisture.....the whole board will look like it's dipped in clear coat....usually used in outside applications that could become exposed to the elements....or in aircraft and marine use.... [nerdly]

Now that you say the, I have seen it before when I watched them replace the node in front of my house , the guy showed the thing to me. When I read the term originally, I was thinking something on the lines of a deposit, or a formation that might occur.

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what's ESD??

Electro Static Discharge......on a 5 volt processor....only takes about 100 volts to destroy it...for a poke that you feel on a door knob....that's around 37,000 volts...

So I guess your answer is...STATIC .... :wink:

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And remember....grounding is paramont...if you don't have an ESD strap....just lick both index fingers...and touch the case chassis FIRST.

Good advice. if you want to be extra safe, especially if you are moving around a lot when working on a computer always remember to keep a arm or leg on a unpainted part of the chassis so you don't fry some parts.

The 1000's of times I have worked on computers, I have never used a static strap and never will, but I have never fried a single part because I always keep something touching unpainted metal.

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